Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 5th Nov 2010 19:15 UTC, submitted by Debjit
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Finally. Finally the leader of a major distribution who has the guts to stand up and say what a lot of people have known for a long time, but didn't dare to say because it usually leads to a storm of criticism. Mark Shuttleworth has announced that Ubuntu will be moving away from X.org, opting to go with Wayland instead.
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boldingd
Member since:
2009-02-19

"Yes but you are not the use case Ubuntu is going for. What good would network transparency do on a desktop or a netbook?


Depends on what kind of environment you run that desktop in. On your home PC, it's probably not a lot of use. In a software development shop where logging into other people's machine with ssh is routine, it's absolutely invaluable.
"

Indeed. Remote X was an invaluable feature in the lab I worked in. It was actually a lot better than (the way I understand that) most remote desktop clients work, because it didn't lock the remote machine's screen: ten different users could be remoted into the same machine from ten other seats, without affecting a user actually sitting at that seat. (IIRC, windows remote desktop, at least, will lock the remote screen. This would not have worked.) There are some situations where remote X is extremely helpful.

And some of us have more than one computer at home, too. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

IIRC, windows remote desktop, at least, will lock the remote screen. This would not have worked.


RDP server in Windows XP Pro (probably Vista and 7 as well) only allows 1 user to be logged in, regardless if its a local login or a remote login.

Terminal Services in Windows 2003 (and newer I'm guessing) allows up to 5 users logged in simultaneously. If you want more than 5, you need to pay for extra licenses.

There are hacks online to allow the terminal services dlls from Win2K3 to be used on a WinXP system, allowing you to connect 5 users simultaneously. Works surprisingly well. ;) Especially when XP is running in a Linux-KVM virtual machine. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

Thanks for the info. That still wouldn't have worked: we had applications that only existed on one machine, that the entire lab might need -- you could easily be talking about more than five people. Tools like the Qt development kit, OpenOffice newer than 1.0 and MatLab all only existed on one or a handful of hosts. And there could easily be more than fifteen people working in that lab at a time, any one of which could conceivably need access to any one of those tools.

There's also the nice property that remote X windows interleave with your own local application windows, which enables smoother workflow than otherwise.

Reply Parent Score: 2

twitterfire Member since:
2008-09-11


Indeed. Remote X was an invaluable feature in the lab I worked in. It was actually a lot better than (the way I understand that) most remote desktop clients work, because it didn't lock the remote machine's screen: ten different users could be remoted into the same machine from ten other seats, without affecting a user actually sitting at that seat. (IIRC, windows remote desktop, at least, will lock the remote screen. This would not have worked.)


That's false. Remote Desktop Protocol, or, "windows remote destop" as you like to name it, actually allows many users to use RDP at the same time without "locking the screen". Maybe you confuse it with VNC or Radmin?

Anyway, ssh -x sucks badly across a long distance, RDP is much better in that aspect. There are many solutions which allows to use the GUI remote and which do a much better job than X.

X protocol is archaic and a dumb thing to use in 21st century.

Maybe they should name Wayland WNX: WNX IS NOT X. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

The protocol itself allows for multiple simultaneous access. Terminal Services is built on it.

However, Terminal Services in Windows XP is limited to 1 connection only. If I'm logged into the console, and you connect via RDP, it will log me out (well, pops up a warning, and I get the option). If you're logged in via RDP and I sit down at the console to login, you get disconnected.

It's an artificial limitation imposed by Microsoft to get you to use the more expensive Windows Server.

Even that, though, is limited to only 5 concurrent logins. If you want more than 5 concurrent logins, you have to buy Terminal Services licenses.

Reply Parent Score: 2