Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 10th Nov 2010 23:31 UTC
In the News Wait, what - let me get this straight. A powerful politician, a politician who managed to bring even the largest companies to their knees, is on the side of reason in the copyright debate? Yes, Neelie Kroes, in her capacity as European Commissioner for Digital Agenda, has openly expressed her support for copyright reform. Her argumentation is incredibly lucid and clear, and pretty much echoes everything I've written about copyright here on OSNews.
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RE: Heh
by malxau on Thu 11th Nov 2010 11:30 UTC in reply to "Heh"
malxau
Member since:
2005-12-04

Fascinating how - just like with the previous article* - the usual pro-RIAA folks are utterly absent in this thread.


I'm not pro-RIAA, but I'm not anti-copyright either. This article isn't really confronting any issues - it's just nice words for everybody that are intended to offend nobody from another politician. When things get down to concrete legislative proposals, then the controversy will be back.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Heh
by _Nine_ on Fri 12th Nov 2010 05:51 in reply to "RE: Heh"
_Nine_ Member since:
2010-10-13

Totally agree. The fact that a politician had that degree of insight at all is noteworthy; however, her speech greatly oversimplified a complex industry, and her arguments were supported mostly by idealism instead of hard facts about the alleged negative economic impact caused by the current copyright system.

Furthermore, you can sense the latent anti-corporation, socialist tendencies driving her view, which is not surprising for a French politician. How exactly does her proposal ensure artists' works are protected and that they are paid fairly? Who exactly will run this one, single entity? A big, bureaucratic EU agency of course, staffed with employees with 30-hour work weeks.

Reply Parent Score: -1

RE[3]: Heh
by Thom_Holwerda on Fri 12th Nov 2010 06:33 in reply to "RE[2]: Heh"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Furthermore, you can sense the latent anti-corporation, socialist tendencies driving her view, which is not surprising for a French politician.


Fail. Double fail.

She's not French.

She's not socialist.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Heh
by vodoomoth on Fri 12th Nov 2010 13:10 in reply to "RE[2]: Heh"
vodoomoth Member since:
2010-03-30

however, her speech greatly oversimplified a complex industry, and her arguments were supported mostly by idealism instead of hard facts about the alleged negative economic impact caused by the current copyright system.

I don't know much about all of the copyright and/or patent systems to bring anything valuable to the discussion but I while reading the news item, I was hoping for a proposal that didn't come.

Furthermore, you can sense the latent anti-corporation, socialist tendencies driving her view, which is not surprising for a French politician.

What is wrong with being socialist? Are you one of those who were demonizing the American health-care reform? I asked myself why there were so many "mots français" (French words) in the speech, all the more since Thom mentioned her in one or two of the podcasts. She's Dutch, not French.
A big, bureaucratic EU agency of course, staffed with employees with 30-hour work weeks.

Are you a European citizen? I don't know what all politicians do but I can guarantee nobody works those hours in Europe. EXCEPT a limited number (36 exactly) of dockers and crane operators at the port of Marseille who literally hijacked the economy of the whole department before and during the long period of strikes related to the retirement age... Why? Because they want better "work conditions". Which begs the question "what are their current work conditions?" to which the answer makes any other worker in Europe want to reach for the torches and pitchforks against those "princes". Their conditions are beyond advantageous, they're insanely good to the point that I was shocked when I heard about them on the radio. These guys are so much better paid than the average worker: 18 hours a week, something beyond 3000€ a month not including premiums, retirement at an age that's years before the legal age, and 8 weeks off a year! And they were asking for 12h a week and a pay raise of 450€! These are the exact figures (google "liberation port marseille meilleur job du monde", btw "meilleur job du monde" means "best job in the world"...). I wondered why I even bothered to go through the hell that was my phd, spend six years teaching at a university, work a couple of years for a software publisher, cross the country over 1000 kms, all this to end up earning less than one third of their wages.

Reply Parent Score: 3