Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 12th Nov 2010 17:14 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
Mac OS X The jokes about two evils joining up are easily made, but I'll try to refrain. Apple recently marked its Java implementation as deprecated. Well, we now know why: Apple and Oracle have announced that Apple will contribute to the OpenJDK project, effectively meaning that Java for Mac OS X will be developed by the OpenJDK community. Why do I have this image in my head?
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Not surprsing
by Teh_Mick on Fri 12th Nov 2010 18:08 UTC
Teh_Mick
Member since:
2010-11-12

This is not surprising considering the fact that Steve Jobs and Larry Ellison are really good friends. (Steve was the photographer at Larry's wedding)

Reply Score: 3

RE: Not surprsing
by koffie on Mon 15th Nov 2010 13:15 in reply to "Not surprsing"
koffie Member since:
2010-05-06

Was exactly my idea too when I first heard Apple would not be developing Java any further... It was simply impossible that Oracle didn't know about this move up-front.

I also doubt that Java is that important for Apple anymore. They once tried to push it as the primary development language for OSX, but it never caught on... At this moment, Java on desktop is absolutely meaningless, and Apple is dropping their xserve line. On top of that, development for Apple's iOS platform becoming popular resulted in a lot of new objective-C coders out-there using Xcode to develop on macs, making the jump to OSX development dead-easy. Java doesn't fit in their picture, it only costs them a lot of money to maintain a version that's lagging behind the official releases...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Not surprsing
by someone on Wed 17th Nov 2010 00:50 in reply to "Not surprsing"
someone Member since:
2006-01-12

This is not surprising considering the fact that Steve Jobs and Larry Ellison are really good friends. (Steve was the photographer at Larry's wedding)


Actually, I would justify this move as part of their larger move to return the control of plugins back to the browser (they also started to unbundle Flash from OS X). There is really no way for them to keep up with all the security updates, and removing these responsibilities would also reduce the number of OS X vulnerabilities posted each month.

Reply Parent Score: 2