Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 18th Nov 2010 23:51 UTC
Legal "The Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act sets up a system through which the US government can blacklist a pirate website from the Domain Name System, ban credit card companies from processing US payments to the site, and forbid online ad networks from working with the site. This morning, COICA unanimously passed the Senate Judiciary Committee."
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Drumhellar
Member since:
2005-07-12

And now we'll just have extensive lists of DNS entries in our own "hosts" files which we share with each other underground while the government attempts to screw with the DNS system in order to prevent us from visiting the sites we enjoy...

Alternative underground DNS systems will simply become more popular than they are today - being hosted in foreign nations outside of the U.S. government's control.


That's not even necessary. You just have to set your DNS to a non-US one.

Reply Parent Score: 4

umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

That's not even necessary. You just have to set your DNS to a non-US one.


I guess it depends on where the root servers are physically located. I admit I haven't investigated this.

Edit: Since U.S.-based registrars will be required to blacklist the records too, it won't matter where you're located.

IOW, this will eventually affect the entire world.

Edited 2010-11-19 04:05 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24


Edit: Since U.S.-based registrars will be required to blacklist the records too, it won't matter where you're located.

IOW, this will eventually affect the entire world.

If this is true it's insane. Particularly since it seems like the US government are able to get away with anything as long as they cite 'in order to protect the nation' or some such. I wonder how many seconds it will take until wikileaks.org is blacklisted if this passes into law...

Reply Parent Score: 5

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

I guess it depends on where the root servers are physically located. I admit I haven't investigated this.


The root servers are all over the world and not all are controlled by American interests. They could just ignore parts of the zone transfers from the US and go on serving the records.
Would make for some interesting controversy, that.

Since U.S.-based registrars will be required to blacklist the records too, it won't matter where you're located.


The registrars does not control the root servers though, only domains that has been registered with them and fortunately not all registrars are US-based.

IOW, this will eventually affect the entire world.


Perhaps or maybe the world finally tells the US to go fuck itself.

Reply Parent Score: 4

SuperDaveOsbourne Member since:
2007-06-24

Yep, problem is that the US will go to the UN and like so many other things pressure other countries to make US law the world new order law. Its a sad day... yet again.

Reply Parent Score: 2