Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 22nd Nov 2010 19:53 UTC
Novell and Ximian We were well aware that Novell had put itself on the market, coyly winking at passers-by, displaying its... Assets. VMware was a contender, but things have played out entirely different: Novell has been bought by Attachmate Corp., with a Microsoft-led consortium buying unspecified intellectual property from Novell.
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RE[13]: rms was right- as usual
by jpobst on Tue 23rd Nov 2010 03:39 UTC in reply to "RE[12]: rms was right- as usual"
jpobst
Member since:
2006-09-26

What on earth are you even arguing anymore?

Proprietary.

Certainly not closed-source, but still proprietary.

Mono is 100% open and free software. Whether or not a 3rd party thinks they have a patent on something does not make it proprietary.

Microsoft suing TomTom over FAT technology in Linux did not make Linux a proprietary operating system.

... and it has changed to a situation where Mono is paid for by an entity funded (at least in part) directly by Microsoft.

This is OK ... exactly how?

If you are talking about the IP (patents) being transferred to the holding company, that has nothing to do with Mono. You might be surprised to find out that Mono is <1% of Novell. Mono's code and team is going to Attachmate.

You can also infer this from the Miguel twitter post you referenced, which says "our paychecks will come from Attachmate instead of Novell".

Reply Parent Score: 1

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

What on earth are you even arguing anymore? Proprietary. Certainly not closed-source, but still proprietary. Mono is 100% open and free software.


Microsoft themselves would argue with you. Mono is open source, and you can get the source code at no monetary cost, but it is not licensed (from Microsoft). You have no permission from Microsoft to run (some parts) of it that Microsoft would argue that you need a license to run. The only way to get such a license is to pay for Novell SLED (the license is included in the fee for SLED).

This is a part of what the whole Novell-Microsoft agreement was about. This is what Microsoft call "interoperability". Microsoft will try to get some of their technology into Linux (in the name of interoperability) so that Linux users will have to pay a license fee to Microsoft to run it. So far they have been only very marginally successful. So far, there is no need whatsoever for Linux users to HAVE to run Mono and Moonlight. There are plenty of alternatives to Mono that Linux users could move to in an instant.

Whether or not a 3rd party thinks they have a patent on something does not make it proprietary.[q/]

It certainly does, if someone has to pay a license fee for running it. That alone makes it proprietary.

[q] Microsoft suing TomTom over FAT technology in Linux did not make Linux a proprietary operating system.


No, but TomTom agreed to pay a license to Microsoft for running the FAT filesystem implementation in Linux. Since there is a license paid, that bit of software fits the definition of proprietary software (as far as Microsoft licensing are concerned), even though it certainly doesn't apply to the entire Linux kernel.

The Linux kernel developers would heartily disagree that a license is required for the FAT filesystem in Linux. They claim that it doesn't infringe any long filename patents, and they are most probably entirely correct. This doesn't help TomTom, who were looking at either paying a nominal license fee so that Microsoft could get bragging rights, or going to court costing them a fortune. far easier and cheaper for TomTom to acquiesce, and simply pay up and shut up.

Reply Parent Score: 2

TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

Microsoft themselves would argue with you.

[/q]
Guess the Linux Kernel, every BSD, and basically _any_ OS is proprietary, because nearly all implement FAT32, and you're still under the impression that MS saying things makes them more true than reality.

Reply Parent Score: 2