Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 25th Nov 2010 22:56 UTC
Windows Since the US is stuffing turkeys down their faces today, we're a little low on news. As such, let's talk about this sort-of jailbreak for Windows Phone 7 devices. Like iOS, you can't sideload applications by default, and as such, we need to resort to hacks to unshackle Windows Phone 7 phones from the Marketplace. This has been made incredibly easy. Also, just to annoy those that don't like unicorns: PINK FLUFFY UNICORNS DANCING ON RAINBOWS.
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RE: Sideloading?
by Karitku on Fri 26th Nov 2010 07:48 UTC in reply to "Sideloading?"
Karitku
Member since:
2006-01-12

The ability to load non-marketplace apps onto the phone. Thereby letting in home-brew applications, or applications from other sources.

Marketplace apps are digitally signed so you can't use them. Since this "jailbreak" is using official API won't take long for Microsoft to shut it. Better piracy protection is main advantage that WP7 has over Android, if they lose that why bother developing WP7 since it has much smaller user base.

Developers of this "jailbreak" are saying they only want to allow homebrew, noble cause. However reality is that 1% of users will use it for homebrew and 99% for piracy, look Wii or DS for example.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Sideloading?
by BluenoseJake on Fri 26th Nov 2010 10:17 in reply to "RE: Sideloading?"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

MS probably won't close this, they are not nearly as paranoid about such things as other companies. They'll probably just complain about, while patting themselves on the back behind closed doors about how many phones they are selling.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Sideloading?
by dukes on Fri 26th Nov 2010 16:03 in reply to "RE[2]: Sideloading?"
dukes Member since:
2005-07-06

MS probably won't close this, they are not nearly as paranoid about such things as other companies. They'll probably just complain about, while patting themselves on the back behind closed doors about how many phones they are selling.


Well they are continuing to try to build a positive reputation in the consumer segment (Kinect, Xbox 360, etc). This is just one of the ways for them.

If these were wildly popular devices then this hole would be actively closed just like Apple does it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Sideloading?
by n4cer on Sat 27th Nov 2010 18:45 in reply to "RE[2]: Sideloading?"
n4cer Member since:
2005-07-06

MS probably won't close this, they are not nearly as paranoid about such things as other companies. They'll probably just complain about, while patting themselves on the back behind closed doors about how many phones they are selling.


This doesn't provide any functionality that isn't already provided by MS. It installs MS' developer certificsate to the device. This normally requires you to pay $99 to get a developer accout at developer.windowsphone.com. Basically, it seems Long, et al., paid the fee, copied the certificate, then made the app to copy the certificate to other devices, bypassing MS' service. There is incentive for MS to block this (support/trust/financial/legal) -- they would probably need to modify their process to incorporate the device's UID into the cert.

However, since it doesn't harm the Marketplace (basically lowers the cost barrier for running your own code on your device to ZuneHD levels), they could remove the cost of developer unlocking devices, and only charge the $99 fee when one intends to submit an app to the Marketplace or take advantage of other services. IIRC, the fee is currently waived for students (DreamSpark).

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Sideloading?
by Laurence on Fri 26th Nov 2010 17:44 in reply to "RE: Sideloading?"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Better piracy protection is main advantage that WP7 has over Android, if they lose that why bother developing WP7 since it has much smaller user base.

What about because people are more comfortable with .NET over Java or Visual Studio over Eclipse?

Or how about compatability to write one game that will work on the XBox, PC and WP7?

WP7 might have a smaller market share to Android, but Microsoft are trying to sell a device thats integrated into the greater MS framework. And .NET / Windows has a much greater market share than anything else on the desktop.


Whether this is enough for developers to switch is another matter. but there are incentives other than piracy.

Reply Parent Score: 2