Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 27th Nov 2010 10:46 UTC
Legal The US is really ramping up its war on intellectual property infringement, a war which I'm sure will be just as successful, cheap and supported by the people as the wars on drugs and terrorism. The US has started seizing the domain names of various websites through ICANN - not because owners of these sites were convicted of anything, but merely because complaints have been filed against them. Anyone want to take a guess how long it will be before the US government blocks WikiLeaks? Update: The blocks function outside of the US too. In other words, the US is forcing its views upon the rest of the world once again.
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Comment by Nixtr
by Nixtr on Sun 28th Nov 2010 19:03 UTC
Nixtr
Member since:
2010-11-28

The only reason those sites move off of US soil is to try to hide from the law that protects artists and developers from being denied their rightful royalty.

Calling this big brother is laughable. We all know darn well that the point of these sites is to circumvent paying for this stuff, be it songs or software.

No other reason to go there, except to flie share humongous files, which is something so few of us need to do for free.

I really don't care that they fix this mess, I still can't believe that it got so out of control in the first place.

They are doing you a favor, since the "loading program" is really a big fat trojan full of nasty crap to take over your comp.

And no I am not a shill for big business. I am someone who pays for what I use, and feel that if you do not, you are a liar.

Just my point of view, flame the crap out of me, I really don't care about the opinion of thieves.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Comment by Nixtr
by Neolander on Mon 29th Nov 2010 08:57 in reply to "Comment by Nixtr"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

The only reason those sites move off of US soil is to try to hide from the law that protects artists and developers from being denied their rightful royalty.

Oh, you mean that 3-4% authors and developpers gets on each sold item, right ?

People should stop pretending that those laws protect authors. They protect editors and distributors, before anything else. A law protecting authors would first give them at least 20% on each sale, given their vital role in the media industry.

This does not mean that I defend piracy. But I do think that there's much more than customers at the bottom of the scale to blame, here.

Edited 2010-11-29 09:02 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3