Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 3rd Dec 2010 22:14 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
.NET (dotGNU too) "In a keynote presentation at the Silverlight Firestarter event this morning, Corporate Vice President in Microsoft's developer division, Scott Guthrie officially announced Silverlight 5, and outlined its new features and 1H 2011 beta availability. Silverlight 5 adds more than 40 new features to the Web application framework that focus on improving its streaming media functionality for users and on improving application development for engineers. Some of the new streaming additions include: GPU-accelerated video decoding, variable speed playback which allows for user-defined, pitch-corrected slow motion, improved power saver awareness to prevent screensavers from turning on during playback, and native remote control support."
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RE[4]: ...
by westlake on Sat 4th Dec 2010 20:23 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: ..."
westlake
Member since:
2010-01-07

Everybody could include Ogg Theora, but not everybody could include H.264. Therefore, the optimal solution was obvious : include Theora, and then H.264 if you want

H.264 has tremendous strength in theatrical production, home video, industrial, military and security applications and so on.

Google Shopping returns 65,000 hits for H.264.

To Google Shopping, Theora is a leather-waisted pair of pants you wife buys from Neiman-Marcus.

The list of H.264 licensees reads like an Asian Fortune 500 in tech and manufacturing. The global giants in manufacturing like and Mitshubishi, Samsung, Yamaha are all here.

Pro-sumer at $4500 or a $45 "Flip" pocket clone, the HD camcorder under your tree this Christmas will record H.264 video.

That is not going to change anytime soon.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: ...
by Neolander on Sun 5th Dec 2010 07:41 in reply to "RE[4]: ..."
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Yes, but here we're talking about video on the Internet, which is a public space. If there's a quick re-encode to do at upload time in order to make the video available to everyone, it is much more okay than discriminating the users.

Forcing use of H.264 is effectively the same as calling the video markup video-webkit on Safari and video-trident on IE : putting the Internet back in the stone age of "Only works with browser X"...

Edited 2010-12-05 07:48 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[6]: ...
by lemur2 on Sun 5th Dec 2010 10:53 in reply to "RE[5]: ..."
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Yes, but here we're talking about video on the Internet, which is a public space. If there's a quick re-encode to do at upload time in order to make the video available to everyone, it is much more okay than discriminating the users.

Forcing use of H.264 is effectively the same as calling the video markup video-webkit on Safari and video-trident on IE : putting the Internet back in the stone age of "Only works with browser X"...


Thankfully, HTML5 with WebM video is going to be the best-supported technology in web browsers.

Opera and Firefox will only support WebM with HTML5. I think Firefox will also support Theora with HTML5. Google Chrome will also, of course, support WebM with HTML5.

IE9 will support WebM if the user installs a codec. I am pretty sure Safari is the same.

Preliminary versions of quicktime and directshow WebM support can be downloaded here:
http://code.google.com/p/webm/downloads/list

I think that the Windows WebM codec might need to be Media Foundation rather than directshow, however. How difficult is it to port from one to the other?
According to Microsoft:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa468614.aspx

Anyway, it won't be long (perhaps by the time that IE9 is released) that HTML5/WebM will become at least as widely available on all browsers as Flash is now.

HTML5/WebM capability will certainly be far more commonly found on client browsers than Silverlight 5.

Edited 2010-12-05 11:00 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3