Linked by David Adams on Sun 5th Dec 2010 20:33 UTC, submitted by dylansmrjones
Oracle and SUN Oracle executives talked up on Thursday the planned Solaris 11 release due in 2011, with the Unix OS upgrade offering advancements in availability, security, and virtualization. The OS will feature next-generation networking capabilities for scalability and performance, said John Fowler, Oracle executive vice president of systems, at a company event in Santa Clara, Calif. "It's a complete reworking of [the] enterprise OS," he said. Oracle took over Solaris when the company acquired Sun Microsystems early this year.
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RE[2]: Really...
by Slambert666 on Mon 6th Dec 2010 13:40 UTC in reply to "RE: Really..."
Slambert666
Member since:
2008-10-30

Oracle didn't need to rework Solaris ... it's been evolving nicely on it's own (transparency/OSS issues aside).


Maybe you call up John Fowler, Oracle executive vice president of systems, and tell him he is waisting money because Solaris is so damn fantastic it needs no rework or whatever.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: Really...
by lucas_maximus on Mon 6th Dec 2010 17:10 in reply to "RE[2]: Really..."
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

"Oracle didn't need to rework Solaris ... it's been evolving nicely on it's own (transparency/OSS issues aside).


Maybe you call up John Fowler, Oracle executive vice president of systems, and tell him he is waisting money because Solaris is so damn fantastic it needs no rework or whatever.
"


What a rude response. All that ctl alt delete said was that it been progressing nicely and in a methodical fashion.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Really...
by Kebabbert on Mon 6th Dec 2010 18:04 in reply to "RE[2]: Really..."
Kebabbert Member since:
2007-07-27

I think he is refering to Solaris 10. Solaris 11 is a complete rework, compared to S10.

For instance, S11 scales much better now, up to thousands of threads and cpus. S10 scaled very good earlier, the best of all OS - for instance, it could handle 512 cpus (each thread is treated as an individual cpu) in Sun T5440 without problems.

But Oracle will release an Solaris server in 2015 that has 16.384 threads, which need a rework of scaling, it will be driven by S11. No OS can scale to that many threads/cpus today.

For instance, recently IBM released their POWER7 cpu. Their biggest POWER7 server released a couple of months ago, has something like 256 cores or so. The mature IBM Enterprise Unix AIX, could not handle that many cores. AIX was rewritten (according to several articles on IT-web sites, such as theregister.co.uk) to handle the biggest POWER7 server with as little as 256 cores. The step from 256 cores, up to 16.384 cores is huge and needs a complete rework.

Linux supercomputers are basically a bunch of PCs on a fast network. That is a different kind of scaling which is easy to do. But to scale to thousands of threads in one single server, is difficult. No one can scale to that many cpus today.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Really...
by wigry on Tue 7th Dec 2010 12:02 in reply to "RE[3]: Really..."
wigry Member since:
2008-10-09

IMHO IBM does not use AIX on its heavy boxes but really big iron is controlled b specifically written z/OS

The big System Z is basically an array of smaller computers and then there is one z/OS on top of that which commands those smaller computers. Each small box however may contain its separate OS (like AIX or Linux if you will).

Now Solaris is targeted to the same level as z/OS is so it can handle lots of resources.

And then there is HPUX and thats pretty much all about mainframe business.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Really...
by TheOrqwithVagrant on Tue 7th Dec 2010 19:05 in reply to "RE[3]: Really..."
TheOrqwithVagrant Member since:
2007-08-16


For instance, S11 scales much better now, up to thousands of threads and cpus. S10 scaled very good earlier, the best of all OS - for instance, it could handle 512 cpus (each thread is treated as an individual cpu) in Sun T5440 without problems.


It seems a bit premature to proclaim as fact that Solaris 11 scales up to "thousands of threads and CPUs" when there aren't yet any 1000+ core servers on which Solaris will run (unless someone's gotten Solaris x86 to boot on an Altix UV - that'd be a very cool thing to see benchmarked).

Further, at least according to Oracle's product page, the largest configuration for the T5440 has 256 threads. Do you have a link to any benchmarks that show scaling up to 256-way SMP on a single solaris instance? It'd be really interesting to see.


Linux supercomputers are basically a bunch of PCs on a fast network. That is a different kind of scaling which is easy to do. But to scale to thousands of threads in one single server, is difficult. No one can scale to that many cpus today.


While MOST Linux supercomputers listed on the Top500 are indeed clusters, the Altix 3000 & 4000-series from SGI are not clusters but large NUMA machines (same "breed" of system as the big boxes from Oracle, IBM,etc) and scaled beyond a 1000 CPUs years ago. Setups with of up to 4096 CPUs in a single instance were sold by SGI as far back as 2006.

Linux scaling _used to be_ rather sad compared to the high end UNIXes and compared to Solaris and IRIX in particular. That rapidly started changing once SGI got into the game and decided to replace IRIX with Linux. Today, both Solaris and Linux scale very well. I believe Solaris still has the edge in scaling linearly up to the largest systems a single instance will run on, but Linux is supported on considerably larger setups, thanks to SGI.

Reply Parent Score: 1