Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 7th Dec 2010 23:27 UTC
Games Sometimes, it's good to reminisce. To look back upon what came before us, in order to better understand what lies ahead. Last week, I bought a piece of computing history I missed out on, a piece I've desperately been wanting to have for a long time now. I bought what is most likely the best selling computer of all time.
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RE[3]: Comment by Neolander
by Raffaele on Wed 8th Dec 2010 10:23 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Neolander"
Raffaele
Member since:
2005-11-12

You need to dig deeply into its guts and perform dirty tricks with its firmware to make a console running something that barely resembles performing a computer for anyday usage.


Uhm, no. There's a sanctioned Linux kit for the Playstation 2, released and sold by Sony.
[/q]

It is limited.

You can't access with that Linux distro the real capabilities of all PS2 components and unleash its full power.

Sony has prevented that distro to access full capabilities of PS2.

How is that "digging deeply into its guts" and "dirty tricks"? No offence, but last time I checked, the ability to run Linux on the PS2 makes it a hell of a lot more useful than any Amiga. Same applies to the Dreamcast and Xbox.


That's questionable.

Infacts, as I said previously, modern consoles are full of hardware such as Hard Disks, but you can't expand a console.

It is a product that is born to be with certain characteristics, and you can't expand it just because the manufacturers are planning from the beginning that geeks and core users, and finally the entire market will drop in the trash the old models and purchase a new console unit any time they put new features in it (such as WiFi for example).

Consoles are born to be "usable and disposable" with a high consumption and replacing ratio.

I have nothing versus consoles, but facts says that are just limited computers, and born to play games and sometimes play movies or music.

And by the way, if with that statement you tried to hurt my ego as for the fact I am an amigan, you failed miserably.

However nice try. Better luck next time.

Edited 2010-12-08 10:32 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Neolander
by Neolander on Wed 8th Dec 2010 10:28 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Neolander"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Infacts, as I said previously, modern consoles are full of hardware such as Hard Disks, but you can't expand a console.

I have one thing to say : Game Boy Camera ^^

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by Neolander
by Raffaele on Wed 8th Dec 2010 10:56 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by Neolander"
Raffaele Member since:
2005-11-12

Infacts, as I said previously, modern consoles are full of hardware such as Hard Disks, but you can't expand a console.


I have one thing to say : Game Boy Camera ^^


So what? ;)

I am enough confident (no offense) to show you two devices in the history of consoles:

Mattel Intellevision could be upgraded to a full computer system adding an adaptor into the cartridge slot...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entertainment_Computer_System

Even Colecovision console could became a full computer by adding an ADAM module in the cartridge slot, just as Intellevision ECS.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coleco_Adam

But that hybrids, did not made these consoles became "real" personal computers, but just only hybrids...

It required a special hardware to be added into the cartridge slot, that is not a full featured expansion slot, and it is more or less just add-ons, like what is done with GameBoy Camera.

I.e. the consoles need an ENTIRE external computer connected thru the cartridge slots to became themselves as computers.

(And perhaps GameBoy Camera is just an external device to acquire images...

That not makes the GameBoy a full featured all purpose computer.

You need more and more external hardware connected thru the cartridge slot, to make Gameboy became a full featured computer, just as those ancient consoles.)

Adding expansions in consoles thru cartridge slots is just a crock way to expand it.

Edited 2010-12-08 11:05 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by Neolander
by garyd on Wed 8th Dec 2010 19:24 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Neolander"
garyd Member since:
2008-10-22

It is limited. You can't access with that Linux distro the real capabilities of all PS2 components and unleash its full power. Sony has prevented that distro to access full capabilities of PS2.


And it's not only old and has no updates but it's not been available new since way before the slim models were released -- so the only way to get is via eBay, Craigslist, and other used channels. The Dreamcast still has a NetBSD port that's alive and well but interest in running any form of Unix on consoles has always been a niche space without enough momentum behind them to provide incentive for folks to keep hacking them and updating their distributions. YDL for PS3 was keeping current until Sony pulled their official means of installing it but I haven't checked to see what's going on there since George Hotz et al have stepped in to fill the gap.

Reply Parent Score: 1