Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 8th Dec 2010 12:16 UTC
Internet & Networking It looks like several companies are learning what happens when you mess with the internet - and they're learning it the hard way. Several major companies have been hit by the collective powers of Anonymous after 4chan launched several distributed denial-of-service attacks. What many have been predicting for a long time now has finally happened: an actual war between the powers that be on one side, and the internet on the other. Update: PayPal has admitted their WikiLeaks snub came after pressure from the US government, and Datacell, which takes care of payments to Wikileaks, is threatening to sue MasterCard over Wikileaks' account suspension. Update II: Visa.com is down due to the attack. Update III: PayPal has caved under the pressure, and will release the funds in the WikiLeaks account.
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RE[7]: Say it isn't so, Thom
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 8th Dec 2010 19:56 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Say it isn't so, Thom"
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

First, Julian Assange is not a US citizen, nor is WikiLeaks a US organisation. Hence, your precious espionage act can go to hell. In other words, you still haven't shown a single US law violated by Assange or WikiLeaks. I've broken US law more times than I can count - I break it almost every day - but since I'm not a US citizen (thank god), I actually didn't break it at all.

Second, I assume this means you believe The New York Times should be prosecuted as well?

Good luck with that.

Reply Parent Score: 1

FresheBakked Member since:
2010-12-08

Absolutely, Thom.

We see your leftist / liberalism shining-through, Thom - and that can go to hell in a handbasket.

OSNews has now become another faggoty version of /.

Enjoy your ignorance, Thom. You're the one who started the snide comments and can't deal with the facts. We've extradited hackers before, and now we're going to extradite Ass-ange.

Manning will hang, and Assange will be extradited.

Deal with it, son.

Freshe Bakked - out.

Edited 2010-12-08 20:09 UTC

Reply Parent Score: -1

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Absolutely, Thom.

We see your leftist / liberalism shining-through, Thom - and that can go to hell in a handbasket.

OSNews has now become another faggoty version of /.

Enjoy your ignorance, Thom. You're the one who started the snide comments and can't deal with the facts. We've extradited hackers before, and now we're going to extradite Ass-ange.

Manning will hang, and Assange will be extradited.

Deal with it, son.

Freshe Bakked - out.


Wait - you're going to "extradite" Assange? You might want to look up what extradite means, kiddo.

Thanks for the laugh, kid.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Say it isn't so, Thom
by Bounty on Wed 8th Dec 2010 21:34 in reply to "RE[7]: Say it isn't so, Thom"
Bounty Member since:
2006-09-18

First, Julian Assange is not a US citizen, nor is WikiLeaks a US organisation. Hence, your precious espionage act can go to hell. In other words, you still haven't shown a single US law violated by Assange or WikiLeaks. I've broken US law more times than I can count - I break it almost every day - but since I'm not a US citizen (thank god), I actually didn't break it at all.

Second, I assume this means you believe The New York Times should be prosecuted as well?

Good luck with that.


If you're talking about:
'Failure to fulfill dual criminality - generally the act for which extradition is sought must constitute a crime punishable by some minimum penalty in both the requesting and the requested parties."

Espionage has been a crime in the UK since at least 1911. https://www.mi5.gov.uk/output/espionage-and-the-law.html

Second, what's this about the New York Times? If we're going back to the Pentagon papers type of argument, then see http://www.osnews.com/thread?452770

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Say it isn't so, Thom
by boldingd on Thu 9th Dec 2010 00:36 in reply to "RE[7]: Say it isn't so, Thom"
boldingd Member since:
2009-02-19

No, but, any U.S. organization that supports or works with Assange is potentially liable, see above. Materially, if Amazon had hosted WikiLeaks, or PayPal had continued to process payments to WikiLeaks, they could have been prosecuted under U.S. law.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Say it isn't so, Thom
by vodoomoth on Thu 9th Dec 2010 12:24 in reply to "RE[7]: Say it isn't so, Thom"
vodoomoth Member since:
2010-03-30

First, Julian Assange is not a US citizen, nor is WikiLeaks a US organisation. Hence, your precious espionage act can go to hell.

Can't non-US citizens be prosecuted for espionage?

I vaguely remember the story of a russian spy ring in the summer and I must confess I don't even know where that story went. One of those people was a woman whose facebook photograph appeared in news paper front pages... for some time. Couldn't these people be prosecuted? What if they were just residents? what happens then?

The citizenship requirement seems weird.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: Say it isn't so, Thom
by TheGZeus on Thu 9th Dec 2010 14:31 in reply to "RE[8]: Say it isn't so, Thom"
TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

Espionage is different from treason.

Foreign citizens can certainly be guilty of that.

Were I found guilty of espionage, as a US citizen I could also be charged with treason.

I doubt a foreign citizen found guilty of espionage could be tried for treason.

Reply Parent Score: 3