Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 9th Dec 2010 23:06 UTC, submitted by Debjit
Windows Amidst all the WikiLeaks hoopla, there's also actual regular news going on. Windows 7 is barely out the door, and we're already dealing with Windows 8, which is indeed being worked on but will not arrive for at least two years. There's some rumours from an Italian website which state that the 64bit version of Windows 8 will have a completely new interface called Wind. Right.
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RE[7]: I call BS - games
by zima on Sun 12th Dec 2010 19:24 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: I call BS - games"
zima
Member since:
2005-07-06

Warhammer: Dark Omen (and Shadow of the Hornet Rat) are decently close to Myst, and were on PS1. Overall there are tons of tactical games (usually with some RPG elements) beginning mostly from the SNES era. Most of them weren't given a chance in the West, sure, but if anything that's because of the approach of the area to more serious gaming throughout most of that time.

BTW, UI paradigm revolving around pointing at things is not the only one for a strategy. Nested/scrollable menu and "jumping" between objects on the map is another.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[8]: I call BS - games
by Neolander on Sun 12th Dec 2010 19:54 in reply to "RE[7]: I call BS - games"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Warhammer: Dark Omen (and Shadow of the Hornet Rat) are decently close to Myst, and were on PS1. Overall there are tons of tactical games (usually with some RPG elements) beginning mostly from the SNES era. Most of them weren't given a chance in the West, sure, but if anything that's because of the approach of the area to more serious gaming throughout most of that time.

BTW, UI paradigm revolving around pointing at things is not the only one for a strategy. Nested/scrollable menu and "jumping" between objects on the map is another.

Uh ? Are we really talking about the same Myst ? A brain-shattering point and click from the 90s where the user is alone on a group of islands linked together by books, with obfuscated puzzles everywhere that must all be solved in order to see the ending - and where you have two chances out of three to get the bad ending the first time you play the game ?

About alternative interfaces, well... The original Phoenix Wright for the GBA and iMyst show that there are alternatives to styluses and mouses for playing point-and-click games, but they often turn out to be less intuitive or to let the user discover things too easily.

Edited 2010-12-12 19:59 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: I call BS - games
by zima on Mon 13th Dec 2010 12:25 in reply to "RE[8]: I call BS - games"
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

Oh, right...for some reason it clicked in me with what the Myth games were; too many years I guess ;p

As for UIs - see how you're talking about "alternative" interfaces for point'n'click adventures, games which were built around...pointing at things. That's not the only way to create an adventure game - another is, also, nested/scrollable menu-based UI (Snatcher, not sure about Policenauts). Even partly point'n'click UI (at least some games from Clock Tower series; here's a bit Myst-like example ;p ) doesn't have to be bad; those games aren't exactly "fast", and after an interaction with the scene it's time for menu; plus pixel hunting was a characteristic of bad ones(*) - considering how point'n'click adventures tended sometimes to highlight or "snap" the cursor a bit to active items, it could as well be dealt with, basically, also by "scrolling"/jumping through items on screen; not only in the menu.

(*)Arguably the whole point'n'click adventure paradigm was a bit flawed - why would it mostly pass otherwise? Or at least used for wrong reasons - because, funnily enough, in many of those games visuals were the best part; story and, especially, "logic" often were simply obscene (one would think that's what "adventure" should be about...). But for a long time FPS games are the way to show off any visual prowess, ever since realtime GFX generation started giving good results... that's where the "pointing at stuff" game mechanics mostly lives now (in the past also PC RTS or hack'n'slash games)

On the other hand - in Japan adventure games are actually dominating on the PC. But it's their flavour - mostly a visual novel; and even if released mostly on the platform where using a mouse is the rule, UIs are menu-driven.

Reply Parent Score: 1