Linked by Adurbe on Sun 12th Dec 2010 21:55 UTC
Internet & Networking For a number of days the websites of MasterCard, Visa, PayPal and others wre attacked by a group of WikiLeaks supporters ('hacktivists'). Although the group calls itself 'Anonymous', researchers at the DACS group of the University of Twente (UT), the Netherlands, discovered that these hacktivists are easily traceable, and therefore anything but anonymous.
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AlexandreAM
Member since:
2006-02-06

Playing Devil's Advocate here. I'm not so sure about how I feel about it, just wanted to raise a question.

Would it be legal to protest by making a huge line to, say, lots of McDonald's, and ask them to give you something they don't have in the menu? You're not exactly making it so that anyone else is forced out of it, it's just that you're going there and placing your (bogus) order.

They can, of course, refuse to serve you and ask you to get off the line for the next person to be served.

That is one of the possible interpretations I see for a "DDoS" attack. Although I don't really believe they should be "legal", it seems to be a plausible interpretation.

What do you guys say?

Reply Parent Score: 3

LighthouseJ Member since:
2009-06-18

...

Would it be legal to protest by making a huge line to, say, lots of McDonald's, and ask them to give you something they don't have in the menu? You're not exactly making it so that anyone else is forced out of it, it's just that you're going there and placing your (bogus) order.

They can, of course, refuse to serve you and ask you to get off the line for the next person to be served.

That is one of the possible interpretations I see for a "DDoS" attack. Although I don't really believe they should be "legal", it seems to be a plausible interpretation.

What do you guys say?


To use your analogy, it's like a McDonalds is having a normal serving day, say 4 cashiers and 10 customers, line is moving swiftly.
A DOS attack here would be if people bussed in 50 people, they were told "go ask for a bogus item" and when turned away, go back to the front of the line and ask for a different bogus item.
The McDonalds manager, not knowing how to handle the influx of traffic, closes the store.

There's a finite amount of resources that the server is offering. A DOS attack overloads the server resources, and turns away other legitimate users as the penalty.

Reply Parent Score: 1