Linked by Howard Fosdick on Mon 13th Dec 2010 23:11 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless It's hard to predict the future because we humans prefer to think in terms of familiar paradigms. Even the most brilliant of our species are subject to this flaw. Now, Microsoft faces its turn. The owner of the operating system that likely runs your personal computer, the company that achieved monopoly with Windows and ducked the Department of Justice's scythe to keep it, faces a midlife crisis as the world goes gaga over portable consumer devices. This is the story of what's happening to Microsoft in the handheld operating system markets -- and how it parallels the earlier, similar journeys of IBM Corporation and Digital Equipment Corporation. Can Microsoft achieve dominance on mobile devices?
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RE[2]: The issue is Foothold.
by jmtx86 on Tue 14th Dec 2010 15:31 UTC in reply to "RE: The issue is Foothold."
jmtx86
Member since:
2008-02-08

You don't know the server market. Your information is false. Microsoft is the dominate Server operating system. Linux dominates web services and that is even being threaten by MS.

Apple does have a server presence; though its niche. Walk into any media production datacenter and you will find a good portion of Mac OSX servers. To be fair you will find a good portion of Linux used for Rendering farms.

I agree that Linux strengths is the micro OS market; PLC controllers, setup, and any ROM based computer. Believe it or not WinCE also has a good strength in this market as well.

Regarding the stats Android is "linux", so this should be mention when doing a honest statistic. Linux is becoming the dominate mobile platform for smart phones.

Reply Parent Score: 0

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Did the Linux kernel developers allow Google's customizations into the kernel tree again? Last I heard they'd rejected Google's changes resulting in Google maintaining it's own fork of Linux (the kernel) though they do use much of the GNU userland wrapped around it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

SteveB Member since:
2005-07-10

Did the Linux kernel developers allow Google's customizations into the kernel tree again?
This has nothing to do with allowing or not allowing. If Google follows the style, quality, etc that is imposed by the Linux kernel developers then their code will get into the kernel (if it is useful for others).

Last I heard they'd rejected Google's changes resulting in Google maintaining it's own fork of Linux (the kernel) though they do use much of the GNU userland wrapped around it.
You mix two things. GNU userland != kernel

Anyway... Google is trying to get their code into the Linux kernel ( http://www.zdnet.com/blog/open-source/dibona-google-will-hire-two-a... ).

Reply Parent Score: 1

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

I actually follow these discussions, Google in the past made a fork of Linux and didn't do anything with Linus' tree for a long time, other then porting this back to their own tree. They would do an upgrade every a year or so. I think it was even more, but it was to much work to maintain a seperate fork.

The difference between the version Google makes for their own use and Linus' version is getting smaller and smaller. They have a plan to setup some test servers at Google to follow mainline and do automated regression testing for Google's own workloads.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: The issue is Foothold.
by Lennie on Tue 14th Dec 2010 18:20 in reply to "RE[2]: The issue is Foothold."
Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

Microsoft is loosing market share in the webserver business:

http://news.netcraft.com/archives/category/web-server-survey/

They tricked a few parked-domain sites to switch in the past (with a financial incentive) but they are loosing share.

Reply Parent Score: 2