Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 17th Dec 2010 22:06 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
Windows While Microsoft's Security Essentials has been very well received because of its small footprint and unobtrusive nature, it didn't always rank among the very top when it came to its detection rates. Overall, I'd still say it's one of the best antivirus tools. Now, with version 2.0, Microsoft has improved the detection mechanisms, but of course, it'll take some tests before we can see how effective they are.
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RE[6]: XP not excrement just yet
by mappy on Sun 19th Dec 2010 08:13 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: XP not excrement just yet"
mappy
Member since:
2010-06-02

Just out of curiosity, how did you manage to BSOD Windows 7 ?

Same way as any operating system - memory corruption in kernel space - either by failing hardware, overheating, or installing drivers that arn't reeeeally compatible.

The days of bsoding through opening a malicious jpeg are over (arguably) but there are still lots of very common non-userspace ways to get a bsod. My last desktop would bsod whenever i accidentally bumped it - turns out i was missing a few standoffs when i assembled it and it was shorting the motherboard to the case ;)

I had a bsod on my first week of vista trying to install an unsigned driver that wasn't as compatible as i thought it was.

EDIT: You can of course see whether or not it restarts by default after a bsod by investigating the setting (Win+Pause > Advanced System Settings > Startup and Recovery > System Failure).

Edited 2010-12-19 08:16 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Same way as any operating system - memory corruption in kernel space - either by failing hardware, overheating, or installing drivers that arn't reeeeally compatible.

Not much can be done about failing hardware, indeed, no matter which OS you run, but why does overheating corrupt memory too ? I thought it only resulted in the motherboard's firmware (BIOS, EFI, or whatever else) abruptly turning the computer off ?

Edited 2010-12-19 08:43 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Not much can be done about failing hardware, indeed, no matter which OS you run, but why does overheating corrupt memory too ? I thought it only resulted in the motherboard's firmware (BIOS, EFI, or whatever else) abruptly turning the computer off ?

BIOS/EFI/etc can only power the system off if it catches the situation fast enough, and even then there's several 'ifs', like for example not all CPUs handle heat equally well. Like one PIII could only handle 80 celsigrades whereas another one in the same patch could handle up to 100 celsigrades. If the motherboard/BIOS/et al is configured to take a value of 90 celsigrades as the overheating point the one mentioned earlier would already fail before reaching that point and POOF; system crash.

Oh, and of course, if the CPU is overheating the instructions it's executing could return wrong values and thus write wrong data in the memory, or the registers holding the write address could have their values corrupt by the overheating situation and thus the data would be written in the wrong place. And this is only CPU overheating; memory can overheat too, both of which can and most likely will result in memory corruption.

Reply Parent Score: 2

bassbeast Member since:
2007-11-11

It is because the memory is so densely packed nowadays. Look up "cosmic rays and memory" and prepare to have your mind blown. You'd be surprised how many "soft errors" are caused even by cosmic rays interacting with the memory cells as they pass through the planet.

Google did a study on memory errors and found that on 8GB of RAM like I have you are looking at tens of thousands of "soft errors" every. single. month. and it is just the robust design of the software and OS that keeps that from being catastrophic. That is also why on ANY machine where the results will be mission critical or risk lives ECC memory is used, as it will auto correct a good 90%+ of those soft errors and rerun any calculations it can't fix.

But since whether your bullet in the latest FPS isn't really affected by these errors, and the OS will take care of most of the problems, it simply isn't worth the extra expense in day to day life. But that is one of the reason I recommend AMD boards, as you can drop ECC memory into most of them which means if you do use it for work like CAD where errors really matter then it doesn't cost an arm and a leg for an ECC board like with Intel. But check it out, Google it. You'd be amazed how many errors you are probably having at this minute that the OS just deals with.

Reply Parent Score: 1