Linked by snydeq on Fri 17th Dec 2010 22:32 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu InfoWorld's Savio Rodrigues sees 2010 as a watershed year for Ubuntu, one that could herald meaningful enterprise interest in the OS, thanks to a rising tide of developers - and deployment servers - adopting the OS. "As with many recent trends in the IT industry, developers become ambassadors for products they enjoy using and have quickly become an early indicator for enterprise technology usage in the future. In a seemingly perfect storm, Ubuntu is benefiting from strong developer usage, and the fact that developers are increasingly selecting Amazon's EC2 cloud platform bodes well for continued Ubuntu success on EC2," Rodrigues writes, noting that Ubuntu has surpassed Red Hat usage on deployment servers as well. "As that occurs, IT decision makers will need to consider or reconsider Ubuntu for usage within the enterprise. Rest assured that Red Hat won't sit idly by during these discussions."
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RE[7]: Comment by flanque
by No it isnt on Mon 20th Dec 2010 22:27 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by flanque"
No it isnt
Member since:
2005-11-14

Irrelevant. The fact that most people can use something doesn't mean they will. People will stick to the brand name they know, and more people know Windows. Even Apple hasn't enjoyed much of a rise in market share, despite getting more PR than practically everyone else put together.

The only thing relevant to Linux's success is that it's usable. 10 years or so ago, it wasn't, as IE and its mangled HTML dominated the web; after Mozilla and OpenOffice took off, and libdcss took care of DVD decryption, Linux has been pretty much on par with Windows and Mac OS for everything except specialist applications like Photoshop. Whining about market share, for me, as a user, is like crying into my beer for it being less popular than the inferior Budweiser. I'd rather just enjoy my drink.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Comment by flanque
by lemur2 on Tue 21st Dec 2010 03:18 in reply to "RE[7]: Comment by flanque"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Irrelevant. The fact that most people can use something doesn't mean they will. People will stick to the brand name they know, and more people know Windows. Even Apple hasn't enjoyed much of a rise in market share, despite getting more PR than practically everyone else put together. The only thing relevant to Linux's success is that it's usable. 10 years or so ago, it wasn't, as IE and its mangled HTML dominated the web; after Mozilla and OpenOffice took off, and libdcss took care of DVD decryption, Linux has been pretty much on par with Windows and Mac OS for everything except specialist applications like Photoshop. Whining about market share, for me, as a user, is like crying into my beer for it being less popular than the inferior Budweiser. I'd rather just enjoy my drink.


What is interesting is that the list of "specialist" desktop applications that are not well catered for on Linux is ever-shrinking. One such application which used to be often quoted was Autocad, but Bricscad for Linux now has that covered. In reality, a combination of digikam (for digital photos) and krita (for actual raster graphics composition), or indeed the new single-window-mode of GIMP, has Photoshop covered for the vast majority of uses.

The list of desktop applications where "you can't do that on GNU/Linux" is shrinking more and more. Essentially, this former criticism of desktop GNU/Linux is now out of date, but once again people in general don't know that.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: Comment by flanque
by lucas_maximus on Tue 21st Dec 2010 18:43 in reply to "RE[8]: Comment by flanque"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Are you a graphic designer?

Do you work in a drawings office?

TBH unless you work in these industries ... your opinion of whether an open source alternative is good enough is pretty much worthless.

You can't work in both industries (and I suspect you don't work in either) means that you are basing your conclusions on second hand information.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Comment by flanque
by lucas_maximus on Tue 21st Dec 2010 19:15 in reply to "RE[7]: Comment by flanque"
lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

Irrelevant. The fact that most people can use something doesn't mean they will. People will stick to the brand name they know, and more people know Windows. Even Apple hasn't enjoyed much of a rise in market share, despite getting more PR than practically everyone else put together.


Most people will use something that works. Doesn't matter what is running underneath.

I have popcorn hour box media center, it is just a MIPS computer with a harddrive and a HDMI out, running an Embedded Linux. Whether it runs Linux or not isn't really important to me, in fact the only reason I know it runs Linux is because someone told me.

HTC desire, If I didn't know that Android was built on top of Linux I wouldn't know from using it.

Both of these devices have their own custom UI running on top of Linux, I don't see "Linux" anywhere, I don't see the userland or any of the application. I am presented with the UI that lets me use the device as it was intended.

Reply Parent Score: 2