Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 23rd Dec 2010 19:19 UTC
Windows The rumours about Windows possibly being ported to ARM has left a lot of people bewildered; why would you port Windows NT when Windows CE 6.0 is a perfectly capable operating system? Putting all the pieces together, it's actually quite clear why you would want Windows NT on ARM: servers.
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oiaohm
Member since:
2009-05-30

Microsoft doesn't have anything in the SOHO market that supports Active Directory or cloud. They don't have that unifying product that can stave off Cisco or their Linux competitors that makes running SOHO IT easy and integrates cloud services.

Think of a NAS appliance that runs AD, Forefront (new ISA Server), SQL Express, WSUS, App-V, a Microsoft Security Essentials server, and connects to Microsoft's cloud services to run hosted Exchange, Sharepoint, and Azure. Think of being able to run third-party tools and services such as WebSense on this box as well.

Think of them being able to charge a monthly fee for data backup, services, and upkeep. This would create a cloud revenue stream that they do not currently have, provide a seamless interface for backing up AD and doing lots of other tasks companies require sysadmins for, and remove the need for dedicated admins for Exchange and Sharepoint from small companies.

Think of the fact that SOHO PCs can connect to this, be autoconfigured for WSUS, Exchange, Sharepoint, App-V deployment, Microsoft Security Essentials AV/Anti-Spyware, and web filtering, and work.


And here is the shocking part. Linux is inside striking distance on that complete list.

When samba 4 releases almost straight up Linux will have Exchange replacement. Sharepoint vs alfresso Sharepoint normally loses. Virtual apps there are a lot of those for Linux already.

MS is basically forced to port to arm or be broadside not far into the future.

Reply Parent Score: 3

mbpark Member since:
2005-11-17

And the only vendor who's been able to capitalize on Linux in this market and make a decent profit has been Cisco with their Linksys line of products. Granted, there are a ton of other smaller solutions out there, and quite a few Linux distributions, but they're never going to get the penetration that Cisco will.

Canonical or Red Hat can pull this off with the right subscription model and OEM/partner support (Dell or another enterprise vendor, since HP is too committed to MS). Amazon, Citrix, Cisco, VMWare, Apple, or Google could also pull this off. At this point only Cisco owns the stack and enough of the technologies to bring this to market.

For what people think of Microsoft and Sharepoint, they have a ton of applications and technologies that integrate into them very well that they own. Sharepoint has very robust integration services that plug in everywhere, and provide services that the other Intranet services don't have. This is their best-selling new product in years, and they are converting many proprietary apps to use it as a back-end (Project Server, Exchange Public Folders, etc.). Open Source will not replace 100% of that integration. It works fine for many smaller projects, but not for Excel Services or Project Server.

Microsoft has a very large portfolio of products that they have never integrated well, and all signs point to the top. If they have actually gotten an executive into place that realizes what the customers want and need, and figured out that they have many hardware partners that can push out these products cheaply and quickly (Dell and HP come to mind) while integrating several product lines and changing the business model to focus on recurring payments (which is what a CEO is supposed to do!), then they have a large chance of success with Windows 8 Server on ARM as an underpinning to a cloud solution.

And you can bet that when Microsoft starts selling cloud, they will be hammering Google to the wall for their privacy violations, and talking about how Microsoft meets every federal/EU standard with their product lines. They will be talking Green Computing, and they definitely will be talking about cutting IT costs and making PCs more manageable without having to integrate several products. They will also talk backups.

The big thing you can hope for is for Steve Ballmer to shoot himself in the foot. At the rate he's going, it's more likely to happen than not. I think most people realize that you could put any half-decent IT executive in his place and they would have done something similar already.

Reply Parent Score: 3

oiaohm Member since:
2009-05-30

And the only vendor who's been able to capitalize on Linux in this market and make a decent profit has been Cisco with their Linksys line of products. Granted, there are a ton of other smaller solutions out there, and quite a few Linux distributions, but they're never going to get the penetration that Cisco will.

Canonical or Red Hat can pull this off with the right subscription model and OEM/partner support (Dell or another enterprise vendor, since HP is too committed to MS). Amazon, Citrix, Cisco, VMWare, Apple, or Google could also pull this off. At this point only Cisco owns the stack and enough of the technologies to bring this to market.

For what people think of Microsoft and Sharepoint, they have a ton of applications and technologies that integrate into them very well that they own. Sharepoint has very robust integration services that plug in everywhere, and provide services that the other Intranet services don't have. This is their best-selling new product in years, and they are converting many proprietary apps to use it as a back-end (Project Server, Exchange Public Folders, etc.). Open Source will not replace 100% of that integration. It works fine for many smaller projects, but not for Excel Services or Project Server.

You really have zero understanding how close Linux guys are. Exchange Public Folders don't make me laugh. sogo using openchange does that as a drop in replacement.

Alfresso has Project Server features built in. Also Alfresso pretends to be sharepoint quite well.

Samba 4 gives drop in replacement to ADS.

All these don't have to use CAL's.

The delay is Samba 4 its a keystone. MS has to move before the Keystone becomes functional or they are going to be hit by a boardside of matching techs on a platform that they don't have a OS for that is lower cost than the platform MS runs on.

Sorry claim that opensource will not replace 100 percent it basically ready to replace at least 90 percent. What for most businesses will be good enough. Since it will replace the missing 10 percent with other ways of getting the same results.

Arm and open source on servers threatens to bring the 500 dollar server todo most business needs into existence with unlimited cals.

Reply Parent Score: 1