Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 23rd Dec 2010 19:19 UTC
Windows The rumours about Windows possibly being ported to ARM has left a lot of people bewildered; why would you port Windows NT when Windows CE 6.0 is a perfectly capable operating system? Putting all the pieces together, it's actually quite clear why you would want Windows NT on ARM: servers.
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mbpark
Member since:
2005-11-17

And the only vendor who's been able to capitalize on Linux in this market and make a decent profit has been Cisco with their Linksys line of products. Granted, there are a ton of other smaller solutions out there, and quite a few Linux distributions, but they're never going to get the penetration that Cisco will.

Canonical or Red Hat can pull this off with the right subscription model and OEM/partner support (Dell or another enterprise vendor, since HP is too committed to MS). Amazon, Citrix, Cisco, VMWare, Apple, or Google could also pull this off. At this point only Cisco owns the stack and enough of the technologies to bring this to market.

For what people think of Microsoft and Sharepoint, they have a ton of applications and technologies that integrate into them very well that they own. Sharepoint has very robust integration services that plug in everywhere, and provide services that the other Intranet services don't have. This is their best-selling new product in years, and they are converting many proprietary apps to use it as a back-end (Project Server, Exchange Public Folders, etc.). Open Source will not replace 100% of that integration. It works fine for many smaller projects, but not for Excel Services or Project Server.

Microsoft has a very large portfolio of products that they have never integrated well, and all signs point to the top. If they have actually gotten an executive into place that realizes what the customers want and need, and figured out that they have many hardware partners that can push out these products cheaply and quickly (Dell and HP come to mind) while integrating several product lines and changing the business model to focus on recurring payments (which is what a CEO is supposed to do!), then they have a large chance of success with Windows 8 Server on ARM as an underpinning to a cloud solution.

And you can bet that when Microsoft starts selling cloud, they will be hammering Google to the wall for their privacy violations, and talking about how Microsoft meets every federal/EU standard with their product lines. They will be talking Green Computing, and they definitely will be talking about cutting IT costs and making PCs more manageable without having to integrate several products. They will also talk backups.

The big thing you can hope for is for Steve Ballmer to shoot himself in the foot. At the rate he's going, it's more likely to happen than not. I think most people realize that you could put any half-decent IT executive in his place and they would have done something similar already.

Reply Parent Score: 3

oiaohm Member since:
2009-05-30

And the only vendor who's been able to capitalize on Linux in this market and make a decent profit has been Cisco with their Linksys line of products. Granted, there are a ton of other smaller solutions out there, and quite a few Linux distributions, but they're never going to get the penetration that Cisco will.

Canonical or Red Hat can pull this off with the right subscription model and OEM/partner support (Dell or another enterprise vendor, since HP is too committed to MS). Amazon, Citrix, Cisco, VMWare, Apple, or Google could also pull this off. At this point only Cisco owns the stack and enough of the technologies to bring this to market.

For what people think of Microsoft and Sharepoint, they have a ton of applications and technologies that integrate into them very well that they own. Sharepoint has very robust integration services that plug in everywhere, and provide services that the other Intranet services don't have. This is their best-selling new product in years, and they are converting many proprietary apps to use it as a back-end (Project Server, Exchange Public Folders, etc.). Open Source will not replace 100% of that integration. It works fine for many smaller projects, but not for Excel Services or Project Server.

You really have zero understanding how close Linux guys are. Exchange Public Folders don't make me laugh. sogo using openchange does that as a drop in replacement.

Alfresso has Project Server features built in. Also Alfresso pretends to be sharepoint quite well.

Samba 4 gives drop in replacement to ADS.

All these don't have to use CAL's.

The delay is Samba 4 its a keystone. MS has to move before the Keystone becomes functional or they are going to be hit by a boardside of matching techs on a platform that they don't have a OS for that is lower cost than the platform MS runs on.

Sorry claim that opensource will not replace 100 percent it basically ready to replace at least 90 percent. What for most businesses will be good enough. Since it will replace the missing 10 percent with other ways of getting the same results.

Arm and open source on servers threatens to bring the 500 dollar server todo most business needs into existence with unlimited cals.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

You really have zero understanding how close Linux guys are.


The Linux guys are always infinitely close - but never quite there.

Reply Parent Score: 1

mbpark Member since:
2005-11-17

No, I do have full understanding of how both work. Sharepoint is about the only thing Microsoft got right in the past 10 years besides Windows 7.

Linux has been close for years. I remember when people were selling Samba 2 solutions for this years ago (remember Cobalt, who Sun bought? I was running them in 1999).

Alfresco pretends to be SP quite well, which in itself was Microsoft's reaction to Oracle's Content Management Server (which started as Internet File System in 1998-1999). However, there are features of Sharepoint that Microsoft pushes that many of the large vendors such as SAP, Kronos, and a very large amount of software vendors use. Your average C-level with purchase-level authority doesn't want to hear "like sharepoint". Project Server in itself is a pretty complex project that sits on top of it as a front end. For every Microsoft product that uses it, there's another 10 industry-specific solutions that do as well.

I've spoken with Microsoft many times, especially about their latest push to build applications on top of Sharepoint by hitting the verticals. They are aiming dead at Adobe, EMC, and Oracle with this, who have solutions so expensive for these that they will make you wish for CALs. Those who complain about CALs have never had to license Oracle or Adobe LiveCycle.

Exchange still has a large amount of the marketplace. I gave that as an example as how Microsoft is transitioning older functionality to newer products.

BTW, I wouldn't run OpenExchange when Google is right there with better functionality and the ability to plug into your LDAP/AD system.

You have no idea of what I was aiming at. Microsoft is trying to replace the idea of CALs, which are the devil, with a subscription-based revenue stream. They actually have all of the technology to put something together that customers can use and is very simple to use. They actually can package it together and sell it. Cisco, via their acquisition of Linksys, also has this knowledge in-house, and has sold products that have this functionality. Oracle, Symantec, Apple, and Google also have the technology, and have implemented it in various forms.

Microsoft is losing money to IBM, Google, Apple, Symantec, Open Source, Cisco, and Intel/McAfee. They have the ability and technology to integrate everything and present a solution to the customers that is a one-box solution.

Canonical (especially since they do a lot of ARM development) or Red Hat, if they had the inclination, could do exactly the same thing with the right hardware and software partners. Novell got bought and neutered by Attachmate/Microsoft and is no longer a threat (and they have the knowledge in-house). They were the Commodore of Linux.

This isn't about having a solution, it's about having an integrated one.

Reply Parent Score: 2