Linked by Michael Pfeiffer on Thu 23rd Dec 2010 00:05 UTC
BeOS & Derivatives Gutenprint is a suite of printer drivers that can be used with UNIX and Linux print spooling systems, such as CUPS (Common UNIX Printing System), lpr, LPRng, and others. Gutenprint currently supports over 700 printer models. Gutenprint was recently ported to Haiku, both increasing its printing capabilities, as well as extending its supported printer models. This article describes Gutenprint and the effort to port it to Haiku.
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RE: Overblown
by koki on Fri 24th Dec 2010 20:52 UTC in reply to "Overblown"
koki
Member since:
2005-10-17

This 'rift' is overblown.


You say that because you do not know the history between Haikuware and the Haiku project. This lack of recognition has happened before. When Karl tried to engage the project in the early days of his bounty initiative, he was ignored at first and then even chastised for eventually pushing his effort through on his own.

There was even some "ẗhis may be illegal" babbling from then project leader M. Phipps, which he ironically posted as an excuse on the Haiku mailing list soon after the project had taken from Karl the $2,000+ that he had raised on his first donation drive.

After that, Karl pretty much had to beg for a "thank you" post on the website, which I wrote myself and ended posting more or less against the reluctance of the Haiku admins.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Overblown
by AndrewZ on Fri 24th Dec 2010 21:13 in reply to "RE: Overblown"
AndrewZ Member since:
2005-11-15

I am aware of that, I read it in the old posts. And it is unfortunate. To me that is more a result of differences of opinion and naivety, rather than willful malevolence. Ultimately Karl proved his point and we are all the better for his taking action, right? Sometimes when you go against popular opinion to prove your point, people call you names in public, right? This is not junior high school anymore, so it's important to grow a thicker skin and carry on regardless, don't you think?

It has been my experience when dealing with the core developers that they respond to direct questions about Haiku os development, and would rather not be involved in much else. And if you think what would be the consequence of them not doing that, we would have a lot less Haiku to play with.

I do wish there was a formal 'bridge' in place between the core team and the apps team. Like the hotline between US and Russia :-)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Overblown
by koki on Fri 24th Dec 2010 22:23 in reply to "RE[2]: Overblown"
koki Member since:
2005-10-17

If you actually read what Phipps said about Karl's effort here (see section towards the bottom of the message that starts with "wow")...

http://www.freelists.org/post/haiku/Openness,13

...you will see that there is a total unwillingness to recognize that they dropped the ball and that they would not be willing to do anything else but come up with nonsensical excuses that put the accomplished contributor in a bad light.

You may want to put a positive spin to the situation, but, really, using such lame excuses to justify not supporting and eager and knowingly capable individual (Karl had already raised and donated $2K to Haiku by then) and then not showing recognition for his effort and instead chastising him does border ill will.

Sure, Karl pushed through and made the bounties program a success, and he deserves all the credit, credit that was only given reluctantly back and that still now needs to be asked for. So, history repeats itself, and another known contributor to the Haiku ecosystem feels unrecognized. The project never learns in this respect.

As I have always said, development is in very good hands for the most part at Haiku; that the core devs are mostly concerned with development and nothing else. is a good thing. But several other areas of the project (mostly those concerning the wider Haiku community beyond the core devs) suck, as they go unattended as a result or fall in the hands of people who lack the necessary time, motivation and/or skills to perform them.

Reply Parent Score: 0