Linked by robojerk on Thu 30th Dec 2010 00:09 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless I have often wondered why there wasn't a flood of Android portable media players - now the WSJ Reports: "With the move, Samsung will round out a series of Galaxy-named gadgets that matches product for product with Apple Inc.'s line of iPods, iPad and iPhone. Samsung will have the Galaxy Player, Galaxy Tab and Galaxy smartphone. All use a variation of Google Inc.'s Android operating system and work with apps developed for it."
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RE[2]: Comment by kaiwai
by kaiwai on Thu 30th Dec 2010 06:34 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by kaiwai"
kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

As it happens I used to own an iPhone, and have a touch, but now use a Galaxy Phone, and while I agree about Archos, I have to say that some of your critical points may be a little off here:

1. Mass Storage Class - I'm not completely familiar with this one. I use drag and drop to put media on the phone. I use winamp, which I understand will sync over wifi/usb without any issues. Also Double Twist is available. So there are lots of choices here.


MSC means dragging and dropping like you do - as soon as you transfer more than say around 20gb worth of music the reboot and subsequent indexing takes for ages and due to the inefficient way the indexing managed the whole device slows to a crawl because the whole thing is loaded into the physical memory. I've yet to see a company develop a device that doesn't have all the draw backs of MSC - it is simple but it is only useful for people who quite frankly have bugger all music and stuff to sync with it.

Now if they said, "ok lets go MTP" then I'll be happy, as long as they work with the libmtp and Songbird developers to make synchronisation happen both on Mac OS X and Windows without any problems.

2. AAC - supported along with:

Media support

The Galaxy S comes with support for many multimedia file formats, including audio codecs (FLAC, WAV, Vorbis, MP3, AAC, AAC+, eAAC+, WMA, AMR-NB, AMR-WB, MID, AC3, XMF), video codecs (mpeg4, H.264, H.263, Sorenson codec, DivX HD/ XviD, VC-1) and video formats (3GP (MPEG-4), WMV (Advanced Systems Format), AVI (divx), MKV, FLV).
-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samsung_Galaxy_S#Media_support


Good to see they support AAC, so that is already putting them in a good position as a replacement for my iPod Classic.

3. Size and Price - This will be the killer. Although, we know that the Galaxy device will be expandable through micro-SD cards. The 16 Gb Phone is listed at $550 (no Term) from Rogers.ca Considering that the 16G iPhone 4 runs at $660 (apple.ca), and the 32G iTouch is $310, I think we would be estimating a cost of about $300 give or take.

So, I think we would see something very close to the Apple price point. The key here is that with android, the sky is the limit. You don't like the core functionality of the OS, you just change it. The real question here is, can Samsung get out of the box approval to run the Google Android Market. If this is the case, then I think Apple will have a fight on its hands.


But will it be abandoned within 6 months? Android 2.3 is released and no update provided only to be told you've got to upgrade your hardware, then 3.0 is just around the corner, will Galaxy sit in obscurity as Samsung tells its customers of a few months that they should throw away their old devices because they can't be bothered providing firmware upgrades? We've already seen the racket being run by phone vendors who refuse to provide updates even though they can well and truly run Android 2.2. Sorry but when you compare the situation in the Android market on phones to the Apple world - at least when you purchase an Apple i-device 1 year ago you're at least assured you're going to receive a iOS update compared to all the Android vendors who have told their customers to go fuck themselves when it comes to Android 2.2/2.3 upgrades.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by kaiwai
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Thu 30th Dec 2010 21:57 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by kaiwai"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Well, the abandonment issue is pretty misleading.

There are two different issues with abandonment:

OS updates:

It runs android, an open source operating system for mobile devices. There are third party providers of updates that can be installed in the most popular devices to keep them up to date. Relying on the carrier or manufacturer of the devices for updates is not always necessary.


Applications:

You can write your own! No third party approval. If switching to a third party OS is too much for you, you can improve the device itself through writing apps for it, or finding apps online and installing them. Screw the App store review!

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by kaiwai
by kaiwai on Fri 31st Dec 2010 00:28 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by kaiwai"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Well, the abandonment issue is pretty misleading.

There are two different issues with abandonment:

OS updates:

It runs android, an open source operating system for mobile devices. There are third party providers of updates that can be installed in the most popular devices to keep them up to date. Relying on the carrier or manufacturer of the devices for updates is not always necessary.


I have a Vodafone 845 - I suggest you look at the 'third party roms' that require one to jump through several flaming hoops just to get upgraded and if things go wrong then your forfeit your warranty. Sorry I expect the hardware vendor to provide updates for at least 3 years. If Microsoft can support their products for more than 5 years, and Apple can keep providing iOS upgrades to devices over 2 years old then I think at the very least the Android vendors should at least match Apple.

You can write your own! No third party approval. If switching to a third party OS is too much for you, you can improve the device itself through writing apps for it, or finding apps online and installing them. Screw the App store review!


Too bad if the phone or pad is locked down and requiring a hack to get around the restrictions. The existence of Android on a device doesn't preclude vendor lock in.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by kaiwai
by dakohli on Fri 31st Dec 2010 07:20 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by kaiwai"
dakohli Member since:
2010-12-30

Abandonment - In this case the music player will not be connected with a particular service provider. This will make it very easy for Samsung to provide updates. My guess is, that as long as the Hardware can support it, the updates will come. Of course the other thing is that with Android, there is an awful lot of functionality that can be added by third party apps. There are no restrictions like Apple has, so in the end, large updates may not be as big a player as they might be otherwise.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Comment by kaiwai
by viton on Fri 31st Dec 2010 15:43 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by kaiwai"
viton Member since:
2005-08-09

You can write your own! No third party approval. If switching to a third party OS is too much for you, you can improve the device itself through writing apps for it, or finding apps online and installing them. Screw the App store review!

So what is wrong with App Store?
I don't need to wander through web for some obscure apps. In AppStore I can easily buy/download what I need with one click. And I need to enter my credit card in one trusted place to buy software. On PC it is Steam. Too bad they don't distribute other software than games through it.
AppStore prices are very low. For a price of typical PC-shareware game you can buy a few blockbuster titles on iPhone.
If someone is just asking $1 for a nice app or game, only fcking morons will pirate.

Edited 2010-12-31 15:45 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by kaiwai
by JAlexoid on Fri 31st Dec 2010 02:00 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by kaiwai"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

Apple i-device 1 year ago you're at least assured you're going to receive a iOS update compared to all the Android vendors who have told their customers to go f--k themselves when it comes to Android 2.2/2.3 upgrades.


Yeah... So since you actually need an iPod Classic, why would you care for iOS updates?
This BTW sounds like the top-of-the-line device, witch usually do get updates.

And those updates is not as big an issue as some claim it to be.

Edited 2010-12-31 02:00 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by kaiwai
by kaiwai on Fri 31st Dec 2010 07:24 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by kaiwai"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Yeah... So since you actually need an iPod Classic, why would you care for iOS updates?
This BTW sounds like the top-of-the-line device, witch usually do get updates.

And those updates is not as big an issue as some claim it to be.


I'm looking at getting an iPod Touch in the future hence I do a comparison between the iPod Touch and what else is out there hence accessibility to operating system upgrades and updates tells me how long the usefulness of the device will be. Android devices have a shelf life of 6 months where by after that you might as well smash it up with a hammer and throw away where as with iOS devices on average there is a shelf life of at least 2-3 years.

Imagine if I told you that if you wanted to upgrade your operating system every 6 months you had to buy a computer - what would you say in response? you'd probably ask why can't it be provided on your current device. Peoples love for Android and hatred for Apple seems to have blinded them to the fact that they're being ripped off - that the whole idea of 'open source' is a load of crap based on the reality that I unable to simply go, download the source, untar it, compile it and then copy it to my android device then click 'firmware upgrade'.

Reply Parent Score: 2