Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 7th Jan 2011 18:00 UTC
Mac OS X Remember the good old days? The good old days when people cried loads of foul over the inconsistency in the Windows user interface? You know, applications deviating from the norm - with even Microsoft seemingly doing whatever pleased them? This was considered a huge problem, especially by those from the Macintosh and Apple camp. Oh, how the times have changed.
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jimmy1971
Member since:
2009-08-27

Yikes! While I *hope* your prediction doesn't bear fruit, it certain seems to be consistent with overall trends.

I don't like the idea of any device, especially a desktop computer, being dependent on a centralized "store" for software, along with legal penalties for the user breaking or working around that dependency.

Call me a neanderthal, but I value computers as freely-reprogrammable universal machines. While Apple scores supremely high marks in my books for using BSD code for much of their OS underbelly, I cringe at the "Apple-approved" world they are creating, in which any sort of hacking must be vetted by Jobs & Company. How soon before Micro$oft follows suit?

Reply Parent Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

I'm surprised Microsoft didn't do it before Apple.

Take Microsoft Update.
Make .msi the official Windows package format rather than setup.exe.
Allow competing products in the listing along side Microsoft's own products.
Done.

The centralized updates across all installs software alone would significantly improve things.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

The centralized updates across all installs software alone would significantly improve things.


Wouldn't be surprised if that's going to be one of the major new things in Windows 8.

Reply Parent Score: 2

stabbyjones Member since:
2008-04-15

just wait till you have to jailbreak your mac to install "outside" software.

Reply Parent Score: 6