Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 13th Jan 2011 06:32 UTC
Internet & Networking "The promise of HTML5's video tag was a simple one: to allow web pages to contain embedded video without the need for plugins. With the decision to remove support for the widespread H.264 codec from future versions of Chrome, Google has undermined this widely-anticipated feature. The company is claiming that it wants to support 'open codecs' instead, and so from now on will support only two formats: its own WebM codec, and Theora." Sorely disappointed in Ars' Peter Bright. Us geeks reviled web developers for sticking to Internet Explorer when Firefox came onto the scene, and yet now, the same arguments we used to revile are used to keep H.264 in the saddle. How us mighty geeks have fallen.
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RE: What people should be asking
by sj87 on Thu 13th Jan 2011 09:15 UTC in reply to "What people should be asking"
sj87
Member since:
2007-12-16

The really killer question is why aren't Microsoft and Apple supporting WebM or OGG? I mean it's not like they couldn't.


They are supporting it. Microsoft has already announced of an official WebM support for IE9 whereas Safari is able to support it if the user installs the codec for Quicktime.

I don't remember the situation with Ogg Theora, but I don't think missing it is going to be anything serious anyways. It's available as a plugin too, anyways.

Edited 2011-01-13 09:22 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

They are supporting it. Microsoft has already announced of an official WebM support for IE9 whereas Safari is able to support it if the user installs the codec for Quicktime.

I don't remember the situation with Ogg Theora, but I don't think missing it is going to be anything serious anyways. It's available as a plugin too, anyways.


Are you sure? I remember there was a leak that the latest build of Internet Explorer 9 supported Vorbis but I've heard nothing about WebM other than the statement that if a WebM 'Media Foundation' plugin is provided that Internet Explorer 9 will use it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

Microsoft used an HTML5 audio tag with both MP3 and Vorbis _sources_ (such that it would play on both IE and Firefox). This doesn’t in any way mean that IE would support Vorbis. They pulled it quickly because they don’t want to be seen promoting or using Ogg codecs at all; being part of the MPEG-LA pool, and all.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Carewolf Member since:
2005-09-08

Microsoft are usually using their own modular software. It seems likely they are going to use Windows native videoplaying software complete with codecs etc., this also gives them high quality hardware accelerated decoding for free. If they do this they would have to active _block_ WebM to prevent it from working in IE9, and thiat seems unlikely While I can't remember where, I think they have confirmed that they will be able to play WebM if you download and install the codec yourself.

Apple on the other hand are being much more closed. Not sure if it is because they are not using the quicktime framework in Safari or what.

Edited 2011-01-13 21:24 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RichterKuato Member since:
2010-05-14

Not in a meaningful way they don't. DirectShow and Quicktime don't come with any out of the box WebM or OGG support. So for all intents and purpose they only support H.264.

Until they do I call ball$ on their self-serving hypocritical war against dropped support for their favorite codec.

Reply Parent Score: 2

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Not in a meaningful way they don't. DirectShow and Quicktime don't come with any out of the box WebM or OGG support. So for all intents and purpose they only support H.264.

Until they do I call ball$ on their self-serving hypocritical war against dropped support for their favorite codec.


Google could easily pay OEM's to have it pre-installed on computers shipped just as they do with the Google toolbar, Chrome, Google Earth and other stuff that they make available.

Even with such support on the desktop there is still the issue of handheld devices where neither WP7 or iOS support WebM and there is no way to actually provide support via a codec either. If Google does win the battle of WebM on the desktop they would have lost the war because a huge chunk of the market would have been lost to h264.

Edited 2011-01-14 01:52 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2