Linked by runjorel on Thu 13th Jan 2011 19:35 UTC
Linux "At the end of 2010, the 'open-source' software movement, whose activists tend to be fringe academics and ponytailed computer geeks, found an unusual ally: the Russian government. Vladimir Putin signed a 20-page executive order requiring all public institutions in Russia to replace proprietary software, developed by companies like Microsoft and Adobe, with free open-source alternatives by 2015."
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Comment by robojerk
by robojerk on Thu 13th Jan 2011 21:34 UTC
robojerk
Member since:
2006-01-10

It all comes down to money.

Spending who knows how many of dollars on licenses for Windows, Office, Photoshop, <<Insert proprietary product here>>, means money leaving your country's economy and into the the U.S. economy.

Using open source, these governments get free source code they can build on and hire local programmers to customize their code. This keeps money in their own economy, and creates some jobs for locals.

I really doubt these countries are worried about the US spying on them through Windows or something. Don't they (the governments) already have access to Microsoft's source code. Also any network engineer worth their salt would be monitoring traffic from any sensitive areas.

Edited 2011-01-13 21:35 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by robojerk
by static666 on Fri 14th Jan 2011 06:59 in reply to "Comment by robojerk"
static666 Member since:
2006-06-09

Please enlighten me how that "salty" network engineer would monitor even Skype traffic, for example? Of course, Skype might have nothing to do with "sensitive areas", but how is it different from any other closed source application leaking encrypted traffic into your network?

Edited 2011-01-14 07:02 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by robojerk
by Laurence on Fri 14th Jan 2011 09:39 in reply to "RE: Comment by robojerk"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Please enlighten me how that "salty" network engineer would monitor even Skype traffic, for example? Of course, Skype might have nothing to do with "sensitive areas", but how is it different from any other closed source application leaking encrypted traffic into your network?


Because anything on a non-standard port or even (and depending on the port) using a non-standard protocol on a standardised port would be firewalled.

You can even go further and blacklist outgoing IPs or even whitelist "safe" IPs for outgoing connections.

.....and these are just using basic network firewall tools.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Comment by robojerk
by Nth_Man on Fri 14th Jan 2011 10:28 in reply to "Comment by robojerk"
Nth_Man Member since:
2010-05-16

Don't they (the governments) already have access to Microsoft's source code.

Those governments don't know. This has been discussed previously, http://www.osnews.com/thread?454923

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Comment by robojerk
by vodoomoth on Fri 14th Jan 2011 13:54 in reply to "Comment by robojerk"
vodoomoth Member since:
2010-03-30

I really doubt these countries are worried about the US spying on them through Windows or something. Don't they (the governments) already have access to Microsoft's source code.

Is it known whether the governments that have access to the source code are using a version built from that source code or a stock version? I mean, it doesn't sound that complicated to me to show a backdoors-free version and sell a version that contains them.

Reply Parent Score: 2