Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 14th Jan 2011 22:33 UTC
Google I didn't plan on this, but there's really nothing I can do. Unless you want me to write about the upcoming ten billionth download from the iOS App Store, you'll have to settle for this. On the Chromium blog, Google has clarified its decision to drop H.264 support from the Chrome web browser, and in it, Google basically repeats the things that those concerned about the future of video on the web have been saying for a long time now: H.264 on the web kills innovation.
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dtahiti
Member since:
2011-01-13

I think it is a good thing that h.264 supporters are so prone to lying and FUDing, because they are so easily debunked so they quickly lose all credibility.


Saying I am a supporter of h.264 is not true. I love WebM being deployed by Google. I believe choice/competition is the true driver for innovation. I like that we have Firefox, Safari, Chrome (a few years ago, Firefox was not trying to improve itself much until Safari and Chrome appeared and showed how faster javascript can be interpreted. So choice allows people/developers to innovate. So dropping one choice (here h.264) from the ecosystem is not going to do well for innovation.

And sorry, I don't rely too much on press releases. I've looking at the official Android developer page (http://developer.android.com/guide/appendix/media-formats.html) : look down the page, it's last been updated on "Jan 5th, 2011 - Android 2.3 r1".

I am using Linux/Ubuntu & Mac (sorry) for years (before I was using Mandrake/Mandriva). Otherwise, I don't think I'll be reading OSNews.. Just to bash all OSS supporters ?? But thanks to Apple, the "evil", that pushes Android to get better and better at every release. For example, today, it still lags iOS a lot in providing developers good tools to develop. And that's a developer speaking here, who does both Android and iOS apps.

Reply Parent Score: 1

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"I think it is a good thing that h.264 supporters are so prone to lying and FUDing, because they are so easily debunked so they quickly lose all credibility.
Saying I am a supporter of h.264 is not true. I love WebM being deployed by Google. I believe choice/competition is the true driver for innovation. I like that we have Firefox, Safari, Chrome (a few years ago, Firefox was not trying to improve itself much until Safari and Chrome appeared and showed how faster javascript can be interpreted. So choice allows people/developers to innovate. So dropping one choice (here h.264) from the ecosystem is not going to do well for innovation. And sorry, I don't rely too much on press releases. I've looking at the official Android developer page (http://developer.android.com/guide/appendix/media-formats.html) : look down the page, it's last been updated on "Jan 5th, 2011 - Android 2.3 r1". "

From the same website you linked:
http://developer.android.com/sdk/android-2.3-highlights.html
New Platform Technologies
Media Framework
New media framework fully replaces OpenCore, maintaining all previous codec/container support for encoding and decoding.
Integrated support for the VP8 open video compression format and the WebM open container format
Adds AAC encoding and AMR wideband encoding


Edited 2011-01-17 01:43 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

dtahiti Member since:
2011-01-13

From the same website you linked:
http://developer.android.com/sdk/android-2.3-highlights.html
"New Platform Technologies
Media Framework
New media framework fully replaces OpenCore, maintaining all previous codec/container support for encoding and decoding.
Integrated support for the VP8 open video compression format and the WebM open container format
Adds AAC encoding and AMR wideband encoding
"
I appreciate you find this info because it's hard to find more info about that. Beside this statement, vp8 and webm is nowhere to be found in the Android website.

What I found is Google really added support as they shipped a libvpx library (and not the latest) and added suppport in the media player to support vp8. But it's not (yet) considered a "core media format" unlike h263, h264 & mpeg4-sp.

Most people reviewing the Nexus S haven't tried VP8, and just copy/paste what Google says to them. i only found one that has really tested it : http://www.anandtech.com/show/4059/nexus-s-and-android-23-review-gi....

From the article :
"Android 2.3 also supposedly adds WebM and VP8 support, though I’ve had no success playing back any test videos and am working on encoding some smaller ones to try on the Nexus S. One video played back using the android video player had audio but had no video, other videos played back in the browser showed controls but never started playback."

This maybe a hint why it's not a Core media format..

Reply Parent Score: 1