Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 18th Jan 2011 22:18 UTC, submitted by alinandrei
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu De kogel is door de kerk. After years of focussing entirely on Gtk+ and GNOME, Ubuntu will finally start evaluating Qt applications for inclusion in the defaukt Ubuntu installation. Mark Shuttleworth announced the policy change on his blog today.
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RE[2]: shocked
by saynte on Thu 20th Jan 2011 06:09 UTC in reply to "RE: shocked"
saynte
Member since:
2007-12-10

I already gave you two reasons in another thread: dconf is fast, and allows for notification of changes at runtime.

On the second point: being able to receive notification of changes at runtime is not something one can do without changing their source-code. It's a fundamentally different operation than reading a settings file once.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: shocked
by lemur2 on Thu 20th Jan 2011 11:18 in reply to "RE[2]: shocked"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I already gave you two reasons in another thread: dconf is fast, and allows for notification of changes at runtime.


This is not a reason why all Qt applications should be re-encoded rather than Ubuntu itself be re-encoded to better accomodate Qt applications as they are.

On the second point: being able to receive notification of changes at runtime is not something one can do without changing their source-code. It's a fundamentally different operation than reading a settings file once.


But why is it something that one needs to do? Just make the configuration change, close and re-start any Qt application. Just accept that this is a limitation of Qt applications. They will be perfectly integrated in all other respects, and no Qt applications will require re-encoding.

This way, Shuttleworth will be able to offer the entire suite of Qt applications straight away, with just that minor annoyance of not reflecting configuration changes until the next time the application is re-started. Ubuntu users will enjoy a much wider choice of pretty-well integrated applications than they do currently.

Shuttleworth's proposed way ... no one will bother to re-write their Qt apps for no good reason, and Shuttleworth will get no Qt applications for his default Ubuntu install.

How does the latter scenario help anybody?

Edited 2011-01-20 11:19 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: shocked
by WereCatf on Thu 20th Jan 2011 11:40 in reply to "RE[3]: shocked"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Shuttleworth's proposed way ... no one will bother to re-write their Qt apps for no good reason, and Shuttleworth will get no Qt applications for his default Ubuntu install.

You're forgetting that there's plenty of capable people using Ubuntu themselves. It's quite probable they will write the patches for their favorite Qt apps. Eventually the most popular Qt apps atleast will have dconf support that way.

Sure, it's not the smartest way of doing things, but atleast the goal is good: to have all the apps feel even just a tad bit more integrated.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: shocked
by saynte on Thu 20th Jan 2011 12:10 in reply to "RE[3]: shocked"
saynte Member since:
2007-12-10


This is not a reason why all Qt applications should be re-encoded rather than Ubuntu itself be re-encoded to better accomodate Qt applications as they are.


No one said that all Qt applications should be re-encoded, beside you. That's a straw-man argument.


But why is it something that one needs to do? Just make the configuration change, close and re-start any Qt application.


Because it's much more convenient to not have to save and restore all of your work for a configuration change.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: shocked
by TheGZeus on Fri 21st Jan 2011 03:49 in reply to "RE[3]: shocked"
TheGZeus Member since:
2010-05-19

*headdesk*
"ENCODED"???

WHAT?????

Reply Parent Score: 2