Linked by Hadrien Grasland on Thu 20th Jan 2011 21:16 UTC
Privacy, Security, Encryption "In 2010, exploited Java vulnerabilities outpaced the exploit of Adobe Reader and Acrobat," Landesman, senior security researcher at Cisco, said. "Java was 3.5 times more frequently exploited than were malicious PDFs. That really spells out the need for paying attention to what's making the headlines but also paying attention to the types of things that aren't making the headlines."
Thread beginning with comment 459301
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: Apple meet orange
by kaiwai on Fri 21st Jan 2011 08:49 UTC in reply to "Apple meet orange"
kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

Java was 3.5 times more frequently exploited than were malicious PDFs

So a framework that is used to create 1000's of applications is being compared to a single application. Nice. Me like like logic lots!


It was also compared to Adobe Flash which is also a framework located on millions of computers - more computers and devices than I'd say Java is loaded onto and being used on a regular basis.

I see so many end users with Java installed but they never use anything that requires it! My neighbours were looking at it wondering what the heck it was and whether they needed it. How many end users out there want to get rid of it but scared that they might break something - I'd say many.

If there is one thing I remove as soon as I get a PC it is the preloaded crap - Java being top of that list.

Edited 2011-01-21 08:49 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Apple meet orange
by testadura on Fri 21st Jan 2011 10:46 in reply to "RE: Apple meet orange"
testadura Member since:
2006-04-14

Well, the Java distribution on the Windows platform is a mess indeed. It's bulky and has a malfunctioning update mechanism. Oracle could learn some things from Adobe about how they provide the Flash plugin.

But besides this, I really like the Java platform. And for a lot of uses Java is still a necessary. Our clients make use of an applet (embedded in a webapp) to login and sign data using a smartcard. This applet works on Linux/OSX/Windows as long as the native drivers are available. I could not think of a better way to make our webapp communicate with a smartcard on the clients machine on all major platforms.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Apple meet orange
by moondevil on Fri 21st Jan 2011 11:34 in reply to "RE: Apple meet orange"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

It might be crap to you, but in the corporate world, the majority of the new software being developed is either Java or .Net based.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Apple meet orange
by kaiwai on Sat 22nd Jan 2011 05:54 in reply to "RE[2]: Apple meet orange"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

It might be crap to you, but in the corporate world, the majority of the new software being developed is either Java or .Net based.


If you pulled you head out of your ass for just a second I was referring to Java being installed on end users computers that they use at home - I'd say a good portion of that statistic can be blamed on Sun paying OEM's to load Java onto desktops by default.

Reply Parent Score: 2