Linked by Hadrien Grasland on Tue 25th Jan 2011 14:23 UTC, submitted by Debjit
Fedora Core "Fedora developer, Matt Domsch, has announced that Fedora 15 is breaking the conventional ethX naming scheme used for Ethernet devices by adopting a new scheme called Consistent Network Device Naming."
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RE: Why?
by Neolander on Tue 25th Jan 2011 18:27 UTC in reply to "Why?"
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

As far as I understand, with these new fancy parallel startup algorithms (systemd, upstart) which we have implemented in linux distros, it can't be guaranteed anymore that ethX will always be associated to the same NIC as a vanilla setting.

Sure, you can as a sysadmin force a specific MAC address to be associated to an interface name, by tweaking some config file somewhere. But the goal of this consistent naming thingie is to make this process transparent. The sysadmin has nothing to do, the OS itself guarantees that ethX will always refer to the same hardware.

Having met the pain of having my disk drive's block device name changing from one distro to another, I can understand the motivation behind this.

Edited 2011-01-25 18:31 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Why?
by rexstuff on Tue 25th Jan 2011 18:35 in reply to "RE: Why?"
rexstuff Member since:
2007-04-06

But most systems already do this automatically. Check out your /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules

It seems to me that Fedora has come up with a more complicated solution to an already-solved problem. A minor, but needless additional fragmentation of Linux user space consistency.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Why?
by phoenix on Tue 25th Jan 2011 18:38 in reply to "RE[2]: Why?"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

Looking at the naming scheme, it will fail with something as simple as changing the direction that PCI buses are enumerated by the BIOS.

Boot with "Descending" selected in the BIOS, and the top PCI slot on a desktop is bus 0. Boot with "Ascending" selected in the BIOS, and the top PCI slot is now bus 4.

Thus, your PCI NIC will change from pci0#0 to pci4#0.

Yeah, that's consistent.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Why?
by Neolander on Tue 25th Jan 2011 19:22 in reply to "RE[2]: Why?"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Then indeed this doesn't seem very relevant. Don't know why they do it this way in this case.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Why?
by phoenix on Tue 25th Jan 2011 21:06 in reply to "RE[2]: Why?"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

Hrm, weird, my reply to your post showed up as a reply to the parent of your post.

And my reply to the parent showed up as a reply to you.

Reply Parent Score: 2