Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 27th Jan 2011 22:28 UTC
Legal "Sony has won its request for a temporary restraining order in its PS3 jailbreak case against Geohot and fail0verflow, despite a jurisdictional technicality. At the same time, the judge at the US District Court for the Northern District of California has allowed Sony to keep the lawsuit in San Francisco. The restraining order forbids the jailbreak team from distributing or linking the jailbreak procedure, or encouraging others to jailbreak or hack their PS3 or PSN. They've also been ordered to turn over any computers or storage media used to create the jailbreak to Sony's lawyers." Land of the free fail.
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RE[2]: Wiat, what?!
by lemur2 on Fri 28th Jan 2011 00:42 UTC in reply to "RE: Wiat, what?!"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

If you programmed your washing machine to play DVDs with Linux while doing the laundry - then you'd be violating the DMCA, and they'd come after you...


Two problems ... DVDs are meant to be played, and when you purchase a DVD, you purchase a license to play it. How does using Linux to play the DVD (which you are licensed to do after all, since you bought the DVD) violate DMCA?

As for the person who programmed the libdvdcss library that allows Linux to play the DVD, that person does not come under US jurisdiction.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VideoLAN
The project began as a student endeavor at École Centrale Paris (France)


Finally, getting back to the actual topic, AFAIK what GeoHot did does not allow anyone to pirate PS3 games. All it does is re-allow the "Other OS" option that Sony had originally provided anyway. If that is the case, how is there any breach of "circumvention"?

Edited 2011-01-28 00:46 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Wiat, what?!
by brewmastre on Fri 28th Jan 2011 01:03 in reply to "RE[2]: Wiat, what?!"
brewmastre Member since:
2006-08-01

Two problems ... DVDs are meant to be played, and when you purchase a DVD, you purchase a license to play it. How does using Linux to play the DVD (which you are licensed to do after all, since you bought the DVD) violate DMCA?


Actually, I think you're just buying the content. In order to "purchase" the license to play it, you must buy a DVD player (which already has the license fee built-in).

Finally, getting back to the actual topic, AFAIK what GeoHot did does not allow anyone to pirate PS3 games. All it does is re-allow the "Other OS" option that Sony had originally provided anyway. If that is the case, how is there any breach of "circumvention"?


What he did is find the private key that allows code to appear trusted to the device.

Again, I agree that this may be against the accepted use policy, but seriously, should it be considered illegal? I don't think so...no more than my bitchin' V8 powered, DVD playin' washing machine ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Wiat, what?!
by sagum on Fri 28th Jan 2011 02:03 in reply to "RE[3]: Wiat, what?!"
sagum Member since:
2006-01-23

What he did is find the private key that allows code to appear trusted to the device.


From the talk that I watched - They didn't have to find any key or do any hacking to decrypt any files or bypass any of the security to do witht he signed pair/trusted key. They simply asked the PS3 to do it and the PS3 did due to a fault in the way Sony had assumed the code running was authenic and not used any protection in the key signing process.

If anyone should be having law suites it should be the developers of games vs Sony for lack of basic security.

Who in their right minds uses a salt number of 4, every single time ... oh yeah Sony do. And THAT is the reason why people can use the key to sign any code.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Wiat, what?!
by Morgan on Fri 28th Jan 2011 08:06 in reply to "RE[3]: Wiat, what?!"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Actually, I think you're just buying the content. In order to "purchase" the license to play it, you must buy a DVD player (which already has the license fee built-in).


Well it must be a trivially cheap price for the license. Here in the Southern U.S., you can pick up a fairly nice home DVD player that will also play Divx/Xvid, VCD/SVCD, photo CDs and sometimes .mkv files for around $20-30 retail. Cheaper if you eschew the retail stores and buy online.

Considering I couldn't homebrew a player that capable -- even using a free second hand DVD tray/laser assembly, the most expensive part -- for that price, I'd love to know just how inexpensive this license is and why it's never been offered to the general public as a standalone purchase. The closest I've found is buying Cyberlink's DVD playback software (which they did release for Linux) but it's nearly $50 unless you find a license key on eBay at a discount. On top of that, I can't stand their lame DVD software anyway. Even VLC is better (I personally prefer mplayer to VLC, for those who care).

Honestly, the idea of having to have a license for both the content and the playback mechanism is so redundant and unnecessary, it boggles the mind. I can almost accept being licensed to watch the content itself, but the moment my money becomes theirs and the media is in my hand it should be mine to watch how and when and where I please, on whatever hardware I can fit the disc into.



-----
Amusingly, the Daft Punk song "Technologic" started playing on my mp3 player as I was typing the second paragraph. My device is trying to tell me something...

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: Wiat, what?!
by Sauron on Fri 28th Jan 2011 09:53 in reply to "RE[3]: Wiat, what?!"
Sauron Member since:
2005-08-02

bitchin' V8 powered, DVD playin' washing machine
Oh Yeah! I gotta get me one of those! ;)

Edited 2011-01-28 09:54 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Wiat, what?!
by aesiamun on Fri 28th Jan 2011 21:40 in reply to "RE[3]: Wiat, what?!"
aesiamun Member since:
2005-06-29

Actually you're buying the media and the privilege to read the content using blessed methods on that media alone. If you bought the content, you had the ability to use any means necessary to use the content.

If you break that media, they will be glad to sell you more media...you do not have the privilege to download that content again without paying for the use of the new media...

That's how it was explained to me

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Wiat, what?!
by viton on Fri 28th Jan 2011 09:11 in reply to "RE[2]: Wiat, what?!"
viton Member since:
2005-08-09

All it does is re-allow the "Other OS" option that Sony had originally provided anyway.

Actually no. GeoHot released master keys for executables signing while fail0verflow did not.

Reply Parent Score: 2