Linked by fran on Sat 29th Jan 2011 00:11 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems "Each time a new version of Windows is released, many computer users find that their hardware is suddenly outdated. For cash-strapped schools, upgrading to the latest hardware with each major software release is simply impossible. A New York startup called NeverWare is offering a possible solution - a server that lets even decade-old PCs upgrade to the latest Windows 7 operating system."
Thread beginning with comment 460155
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[3]: Slightly off-topic
by jessta on Sat 29th Jan 2011 14:08 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Slightly off-topic"
jessta
Member since:
2005-08-17

memory errors, harddisk errors.
Old hardware dies slowly as it attempts to compensate for all the errors that come up as the hardware becomes more broken.
As a user you don't see any of this, but all the re-trying and error correction impacts performance.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Slightly off-topic
by Liquidator on Sat 29th Jan 2011 14:21 in reply to "RE[3]: Slightly off-topic"
Liquidator Member since:
2007-03-04

I ran memtest a while ago, and the RAM memory didn't report any error. The HDD should be OK too, it's brand new, it's a high-end Western Digital model.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Slightly off-topic
by aaronb on Sat 29th Jan 2011 14:53 in reply to "RE[4]: Slightly off-topic"
aaronb Member since:
2005-07-06

Memtest might show that the ram is fine, but not other components. There could be many reasons why that machine is running slow. There could be a build of dust causing it to over heat. The capacitors on the motherboard may have become worn. Electromigration could be causing the CPU or Chip-set to not work as effectively.

Also the new HDD may not play well with the 11 year old computer.

Swapping components one by one (if you have spares) is really the only way to find out if you are sure it is not a software issue and not an obvious hardware fault.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Slightly off-topic
by bert64 on Sat 29th Jan 2011 15:16 in reply to "RE[4]: Slightly off-topic"
bert64 Member since:
2007-04-23

I suspect your HD is not fully compatible with the old machine, in particular older IDE controllers (i assume being an older machine it has IDE) are unable to perform DMA for drives over a certain size, and thus the drive will be running in slow PIO mode.

I had a machine with a UDMA66 controller, a 60GB drive would perform well but anything bigger would be extremely slow.

Ofcourse, it could also be related to planned obsolescence, a lot of commercial software seems to get slower with age and speeds up again if you set the clock back and reinstall.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Slightly off-topic
by bert64 on Sat 29th Jan 2011 15:10 in reply to "RE[3]: Slightly off-topic"
bert64 Member since:
2007-04-23

memory errors, harddisk errors.
Old hardware dies slowly as it attempts to compensate for all the errors that come up as the hardware becomes more broken.
As a user you don't see any of this, but all the re-trying and error correction impacts performance.


Such errors would appear in the logs... And only higher end ECC memory even performs error correction, lower end memory will just introduce corruption if it's failing.

Reply Parent Score: 2