Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 31st Jan 2011 15:32 UTC
Multimedia, AV Francis Ford Coppola is one of the most prestigious and critically acclaimed directors in cinematographic history. He directed, among others, the Godfather trilogy and Apocalypse Now, and has won so many awards it's hard to keep track. In an interview with 99%, he touched on the subject of art and making money, and his musings are fascinating, and yet another indication that the times are changing in the content industry. "Who says artists have to make money?" Coppola wonders.
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RE[4]: ...
by Bounty on Mon 31st Jan 2011 20:01 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: ..."
Bounty
Member since:
2006-09-18

"That is why they get paid more, because they bring something of value that no-one else can.


I think you are begging the question. The point is that there are probably 1000's of people who can do what they did, but there is no way to make it through the producer/marketing/industry machinery. The internet cuts out all of the promo folks that "build stars" for profit.

Most of these "idols" are really mass-marketed. There are oftens thousands of more talented people who can't make it through to us.

If the content industry has its way, it will remain that way. Otherwise they have to get real jobs.
"


You bring up an interesting point about marketing. The problem is, it's an investment. It generally works exactly like an investment should. Why would you invest in someone not talented, all things being equal? I hate many things in the mass media, but that's just me. It's called mass media for a reason, lots of other people with bad taste like it.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[5]: ...
by Moredhas on Mon 31st Jan 2011 20:51 in reply to "RE[4]: ..."
Moredhas Member since:
2008-04-10

"Why should you invest in someone not talented?"

I dunno, it seems to work for them at the moment... I've ranted my mediocre starlet theory here plenty of times, it amounts to a "plenty more where that came from" logic. It's in the recording industry's best interest to not give us quality, or we'll become accustomed to it and won't buy the rest of the crap they foist on us.

Reply Parent Score: 3