Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 31st Jan 2011 22:35 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Well, most of us knew this moment would come, with the only debate left being when this moment would come. Market analyst firm Canalys keeps track of worldwide smartphone shipments, and has concluded that in the fourth quarter of 2010, more Android smartphones were sold than Symbian phones. After a decade of supremacy, the Symbian dominance has been toppled (according to these figures, of course).
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RE[5]: ...
by moondevil on Tue 1st Feb 2011 10:39 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: ..."
moondevil
Member since:
2005-07-08

Problem is that developing in the so called Symbian C++ is a pain.

Any sane developer will only do it if they are paid for it. If you are developing for fun, Symbian is surely not your target platform.

Sure things are improving with QT, but there is a limited set of devices that can take QT into use, and lets not forget that you are still forced to use Symbian APIs for certain tasks.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: ...
by Neolander on Tue 1st Feb 2011 10:51 in reply to "RE[5]: ..."
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Problem is that developing in the so called Symbian C++ is a pain.

Any sane developer will only do it if they are paid for it. If you are developing for fun, Symbian is surely not your target platform.

Couldn't agree more ;) Symbian is pure genius as a phone OS, but Nokia really does hate third-party developers (or did until recently at least).

Sure things are improving with QT, but there is a limited set of devices that can take QT into use, and lets not forget that you are still forced to use Symbian APIs for certain tasks.

Not sure about the limited scope of QT. Apparently, even my ageing and heavily keyboard-based E63 with its small screen and low amount of RAM can handle it (http://www.forum.nokia.com/Devices/Device_specifications/E63/, "General" tab), so it does sound like Nokia have managed to port it on a large number of handsets.

As for the Symbian API, I can't tell. Didn't manage to get Nokia's QT SDK working properly on Linux, and my will to write an SMS spamming app is not strong enough to make me install that thing again on Windows ;)

Edited 2011-02-01 10:55 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[7]: ...
by vivainio on Tue 1st Feb 2011 11:30 in reply to "RE[6]: ..."
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

As for the Symbian API, I can't tell. Didn't manage to get Nokia's QT SDK working properly on Linux, and my will to write an SMS spamming app is not strong enough to make me install that thing again on Windows ;)


Did you try again with Qt SDK 1.1 preview? It finally supports QML on all platforms, and you can use Remote Compiler to make a Symbian .sis file on your Linux machine.

http://www.johanpaul.com/blog/2011/01/feedback-on-nokia-qt-sdk-1-1-...

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: ...
by moondevil on Wed 2nd Feb 2011 09:25 in reply to "RE[6]: ..."
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

You can only target the following devices:

Symbian^3: N8-00, E7-00, C7-00 and C6-01
S60 5th Edition: X6-00, C6-00, N97, N97 mini, 5800 XpressMusic, 5530 XpressMusic, 5235, 5233, 5230, and 5228
S60 3rd Edition: E72, E71, E66, E63, and E52
Nokia N900, with PR1.3 and later

As decribed in the following link:

http://www.forum.nokia.com/Distribute/Packaging_and_signing.xhtml

Most of them don't have a big market share sadly.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: ...
by vivainio on Tue 1st Feb 2011 11:27 in reply to "RE[5]: ..."
vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26


Sure things are improving with QT, but there is a limited set of devices that can take QT into use


http://wiki.forum.nokia.com/index.php/Nokia_Smart_Installer_for_Sym...

"From a pure technical perspective the solution is designed to work with all Symbian/S60 3.1 and later devices."

That's pretty much every phone out there right now.

, and lets not forget that you are still forced to use Symbian APIs for certain tasks.


Forcing to make a rare API call through legacy Symbian C++ layer is not a showstopper, you do all the application UI, networking and logic in Qt anyway.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: ...
by moondevil on Wed 2nd Feb 2011 09:30 in reply to "RE[6]: ..."
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

"
Sure things are improving with QT, but there is a limited set of devices that can take QT into use


http://wiki.forum.nokia.com/index.php/Nokia_Smart_Installer_for_Sym...

"From a pure technical perspective the solution is designed to work with all Symbian/S60 3.1 and later devices."

That's pretty much every phone out there right now.
"

Except where it does not work. I had quite a few models where the installation always failed right in the middle, leaving a few pieces of PIPS and QT scattered around the phone.



", and lets not forget that you are still forced to use Symbian APIs for certain tasks.


Forcing to make a rare API call through legacy Symbian C++ layer is not a showstopper, you do all the application UI, networking and logic in Qt anyway.
"

It is, when I am forced to use Symbian C++. Oh, what happened to that blog entry from a Nokia college saying that no one on his perfect mind would develop for Symbian?

Yes that is right I do know a bit of Symbian/Qt, being on Nokia's pay-check for some years. Not any longer though.

Reply Parent Score: 2