Linked by fran on Tue 1st Feb 2011 23:04 UTC
Internet & Networking There is a falling out between governments & ISPs on the one hand and consumer groups and companies like YouTube and Netflix on the other. Lately more punitive measures affecting these companies and consumers have emerged that include increased throttling, greater per-usage billing and lower internet caps. The internet as whole is struggling to find a self-sustaining business model that supports the rising speed and bandwidth requirements of consumers and online media purveyors. The conflict boils down to who should pay and to what degree they should pay.
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openwookie
Member since:
2006-04-25

The problem in Canada is that the owners of the 'last mile' for the majority of homes are also in the traditional media business.

Both Bell and Rogers sell digital video (aka: on demand) over their wires yet it does not count towards my bandwidth cap. These new, lower, caps is their response to competitors like Netflix.

Edited 2011-02-02 03:23 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

Both Bell and Rogers sell digital video (aka: on demand) over their wires yet it does not count towards my bandwidth cap. These new, lower, caps is their response to competitors like Netflix.


And now that the telcos have been racing to scoop up all of the media companies, this is exactly how the CRTC should solve the problem with one simple ruling: force the telcos to enforce bandwidth caps indiscriminately. No more turning off the meter for their own content and services. If I have to choose between RoD or Netflix, I should do so knowing it is cutting into my bandwidth allocation either way.

Then we'll see how quickly the telcos reassess bandwidth caps and artifical constraints.

Reply Parent Score: 2