Linked by Hadrien Grasland on Fri 28th Jan 2011 20:37 UTC
OSNews, Generic OSes It's recently been a year since I started working on my pet OS project, and I often end up looking backwards at what I have done, wondering what made things difficult in the beginning. One of my conclusions is that while there's a lot of documentation on OS development from a technical point of view, more should be written about the project management aspect of it. Namely, how to go from a blurry "I want to code an OS" vision to either a precise vision of what you want to achieve, or the decision to stop following this path before you hit a wall. This article series aims at putting those interested in hobby OS development on the right track, while keeping this aspect of things in mind.
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RE[2]: MMURTL
by A420X on Wed 2nd Feb 2011 11:01 UTC in reply to "RE: MMURTL"
A420X
Member since:
2011-02-02


It seems to be a phase that geeks go through at that age. Does anyone know if today's youth has the same aspirations?


Well I'm in my early 20s im not sure if that qualifies me as a 'youth' (then again everything is relative ;) ) I do have fond memories of my GCSE IT class and being the only person to do a programming project for my coursework instead of a database.

When our teacher introduced the module on programming he asked if any of us had used VB6. The class was a sea of blank faces, I answered no but that I was okay at c++ and was trying to learn assembly and c. Our teacher (of the cant do cant teach either variety) seemed to take offence and asked If I would like to teach the class about variables since I was obviously such an 'expert'.

I still consider it a brave moment when I walked to the front of the class, copied a diagram I remembered from my beginners c++ book and got everyone to understand the concept of data types, variables and memory addresses, most could even get a basic calculator working by the end of class. (The look on old teacher's face was priceless)

Fuelled by this (undeserved) ego boost I decided I would write my own OS for my coursework (bad move!) It never worked, but the theoretical knowledge I got from just trying was worth it and my documentation was pretty good so I still got a B for the module (maybe that says something about the difficulty of GCSEs)

What is very sad though is that I knew people who got A* results for the course and still didn't really understand what a simple program let alone an operating system consisted of at the basic levels. Not because they were stupid or didn't care but because IT like Maths is simply not taught properly in schools these days. We had a week on programming and low level stuff and the rest of the year was spent learning how to mail merge in Office and make charts in excel *sigh*

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RE[3]: MMURTL
by Alfman on Wed 2nd Feb 2011 19:48 in reply to "RE[2]: MMURTL"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

"Well I'm in my early 20s im not sure if that qualifies me as a 'youth'"

I was thinking younger but there's no reason to be discriminating.

"What is very sad though is that I knew people who got A* results for the course and still didn't really understand what a simple program let alone an operating system consisted of at the basic levels."

I found this to be often the case.
I had one particular professor for many upper level CS electives who refused to accept "original" solutions to his class problems. He would only accept solutions which were near verbatim copies of what had done in class. This meant that people who merely memorized material did much better than those of us who were able to derive solutions.

After getting a failing grade for an exam (Operating Systems class of all things), I confronted him about this and despite the fact that none of my answers were wrong, they weren't what he was expecting. Obviously he didn't care whether the answer was right, only that it matches his. He justified this by saying that he was a professor for 20 years and that he wasn't about to change for me. I told him genuine industry experts would be unable to pass his exams, he didn't care.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: MMURTL
by A420X on Wed 2nd Feb 2011 23:48 in reply to "RE[3]: MMURTL"
A420X Member since:
2011-02-02

I was thinking younger but there's no reason to be discriminating.


If you mean that I came across as being discriminatory apologies, wasn't my intention - I really need to be less colloquial when I write online, things do have a habit of getting lost in translation ;)

There does seem to be a big problem in the UK at least with the IT curriculum, obviously no school can teach their students about all operating systems and software packages but I think they could try to teach more theoretically and rely less on Microsoft for examples. After all if there's one place you shouldn't be blinkered it's at school.

And maybe a bit more OS theory would spark the imagination of the next Bill Gates - maybe not Bill, Linus? ;)

Reply Parent Score: 1