Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 5th Feb 2011 00:14 UTC
Multimedia, AV Piracy hurts the content industry. This has been the common line of thought in the piracy and copyright debate for years now, and even though study after study highlight that this is simply not the case - or at least, not as clear-cut a case - the content industry and its avid fans continue to spread this party line. Well, yet another study, this time from the Japanese government, has concluded that piracy actually increases anime DVD sales.
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The OSNEWS article is not accurate.
by axilmar on Mon 7th Feb 2011 14:12 UTC
axilmar
Member since:
2006-03-20

I'd like to thank Thom for opening the thread for comments, before saying anything else.

The OSNEWS article says that "piracy increases anime DVD sales", which is superficially correct, but not really correct when one reads the article.

First of all, the article says that youtube increases the sales of DVDs. Well, that's true: youtube contains seriously degraded or partial clips of anime videos. It works as advertising. That does not mean it is not piracy.

Secondly, the article says that although DVD sales are increased, DVD rentals are actually hurt by piracy. That's because the people that buy DVDs want best quality, but the people that rent DVDs don't care that much about the quality and they may be satisfied with youtube clips or DVD rips.

Thirdly, Thom says that he doesn't care about the economic aspect of piracy, he only cares about how arts and sciences are promoted. While that is a noble attitude, unfortunately it is linked quite hard to economics: quality anime could not be produced without having a product on the market, simply because producing anime requires working full time for it. Please watch the credits of any modern anime and check out how many people have worked for it. Does anyone think that this quality would be possible without a product being sold?

Finally, let's not forget that piracy has killed computing platforms in the past (the Amiga, for example), and game companies chose to develop on consoles (and more recently, on closed platforms like the iOS) simply due to piracy.

So, piracy is not a good thing, despite what Thom is trying to say here. Sorry Thom, but that's how it is.

Reply Score: 2

MyNameIsNot4Letter Member since:
2011-01-09

Commodore killed the Amiga all on their own. Don't go dragging "piracy" into it.

I'm gonna venture a guess here (since this is also my view) and say Thom's problem with copyright law is that it no longer promotes the arts and sciences, but instead is a tool for "big content" to suck as much money out of the market as possible. I don't mind people making money, in fact i am trying to myself. However, copyright lasting, what is it now, 100 years?, is f. ridiculous. The person who was suppose to be compensated for his work long ago turned to dust!

The problem is that copyright law is no longer to benefit of society, but "big content."

/Uni

Reply Parent Score: 1

axilmar Member since:
2006-03-20

Commodore killed the Amiga all on their own. Don't go dragging "piracy" into it.


No. Piracy had a very big role in Amiga's death. Software houses at the time where lucky to have sold a few thousand copies, but the whole world enjoyed the games. I was in the Amiga community for a long time, I had many friends with Amigas and Atari STs, so let me tell you something: nobody ever bought any game. We all copied them.

copyright law is that it no longer promotes the arts and sciences


The copyright law never promoted the arts and sciences. It was conceived solely for the purpose of sustaining a business.

However, copyright lasting, what is it now, 100 years?, is f. ridiculous. The person who was suppose to be compensated for his work long ago turned to dust!


It's not about persons, it's about businesses. And businesses can easily outlast persons.

The problem is that copyright law is no longer to benefit of society


The copyright law is beneficial to society, because it allows businesses to live and to give people jobs. If there wasn't such a law, there would be no progress, as there would be no financial motivation for anyone to push back the limits of science and technology required for arts to advance.

Reply Parent Score: 2