Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 5th Feb 2011 00:14 UTC
Multimedia, AV Piracy hurts the content industry. This has been the common line of thought in the piracy and copyright debate for years now, and even though study after study highlight that this is simply not the case - or at least, not as clear-cut a case - the content industry and its avid fans continue to spread this party line. Well, yet another study, this time from the Japanese government, has concluded that piracy actually increases anime DVD sales.
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MyNameIsNot4Letter
Member since:
2011-01-09

Commodore killed the Amiga all on their own. Don't go dragging "piracy" into it.

I'm gonna venture a guess here (since this is also my view) and say Thom's problem with copyright law is that it no longer promotes the arts and sciences, but instead is a tool for "big content" to suck as much money out of the market as possible. I don't mind people making money, in fact i am trying to myself. However, copyright lasting, what is it now, 100 years?, is f. ridiculous. The person who was suppose to be compensated for his work long ago turned to dust!

The problem is that copyright law is no longer to benefit of society, but "big content."

/Uni

Reply Parent Score: 1

axilmar Member since:
2006-03-20

Commodore killed the Amiga all on their own. Don't go dragging "piracy" into it.


No. Piracy had a very big role in Amiga's death. Software houses at the time where lucky to have sold a few thousand copies, but the whole world enjoyed the games. I was in the Amiga community for a long time, I had many friends with Amigas and Atari STs, so let me tell you something: nobody ever bought any game. We all copied them.

copyright law is that it no longer promotes the arts and sciences


The copyright law never promoted the arts and sciences. It was conceived solely for the purpose of sustaining a business.

However, copyright lasting, what is it now, 100 years?, is f. ridiculous. The person who was suppose to be compensated for his work long ago turned to dust!


It's not about persons, it's about businesses. And businesses can easily outlast persons.

The problem is that copyright law is no longer to benefit of society


The copyright law is beneficial to society, because it allows businesses to live and to give people jobs. If there wasn't such a law, there would be no progress, as there would be no financial motivation for anyone to push back the limits of science and technology required for arts to advance.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24


No. Piracy had a very big role in Amiga's death. Software houses at the time where lucky to have sold a few thousand copies, but the whole world enjoyed the games.

Well, it's certainly true that piracy made it hard for those living on selling Amiga games, but Commodore made a living on selling Amiga HARDWARE. Piracy was just as rampant on PC aswell, and yet it totally took over the home computer market. Commodore's failure was that they weren't able to compete technically. The motorola 680x0 series was a dead end performance-wise, and the AGA chipset was simply much too slow with it's dated bitplane technology.

At that time videogames like Super Nintendo and Genesis had as many colors on screen as the Amiga AGA chipset but could offer much better graphics overall using hardware sprites/hardware tiles. Meanwhile the PC had the one-byte per pixel VGA mode which allowed games like Castle Wolfenstein, Ultima Underworld, Wing Commander etc to perform great on same priced PC hardware as the Amiga 1200. Commodore had been resting on their laurels and ended up much like Atari did vs NES. Piracy is a flawed excuse since again, there was just as much piracy on the PC.

Reply Parent Score: 2