Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 7th Feb 2011 23:11 UTC
In the News "So why do all these American reporters, who know quite well that they get praise and money for doing what Assange has done, stand in a silence that can only be called cowardly, while a fellow publisher faces threats of extradition, banning, prosecution for spying - which can incur the death penalty - and calls for his assassination? [...] U.S. journalism's business model is collapsing; the people who should be out in front defending Assange are facing cut salaries or unemployment because of the medium that Assange represents. These journalists are not willing to concede that Assange is, of course, a publisher, rather than some sort of hybrid terrorist blogger, because of their self-interested prejudices against a medium in which they are not the gatekeepers." Great article - focussing on the US, but just as applicable in the rest of the world (except the great nation of Iceland, obviously). The internet could very well become the single most important 'invention' in human history. We must stand guard against our governments getting their filthy, inefficient, censoring, controlling, and damaging hands on it.
Thread beginning with comment 461348
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: Comment by LighthouseJ
by LighthouseJ on Tue 8th Feb 2011 13:43 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by LighthouseJ"
LighthouseJ
Member since:
2009-06-18

funny that my post gets modded down. it's getting even more predictable around here.

So, you just tell me to re-read reports, what, until I agree with you, because you're correct?

And your entire 2nd point is completely off-topic with my original post and your article, and frankly shows your naked prejudiced reasons for posting these anti-US articles.

I don't disagree that the US has flaws and flawed people, most I believe won't. But the real point that you've dodged is that these cables simply do not reveal anything new that we did not already know. Rather, people like yourself treat it like some massive revelation and that now is the downward turning point for the United States, when it's what you've secretly wanted for a long time.

I'm fine with bringing those people before a judge, but if you think the leaked documents reveal who they are, then they've missed the mark. All they were intended to do is to harm the relationships between the US and other countries, and then isolate the US.

Lastly, of course the US has invasion plans to a lot of countries, but that's what you do with a massive defense budget. I think it's done more of an exercise so the US can think as devious as any other country that might want to invade the US.

I do laugh at you comparing the US to the openness of China though. Go and ask them about being open to acknowledging Taiwan and Tibet, them jailing the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize Winner Liu Xiaobo, etc... oh Thom, you kill me.

You, and others too, should get to know the United States more.

Reply Parent Score: -1

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

But the real point that you've dodged is that these cables simply do not reveal anything new that we did not already know.


Then why the witch hunt? Why hate Assange for revealing something you apparently already knew? If you claim all this information was known anyway, then the US' attempts at trying to silence him are even worse.

I do laugh at you comparing the US to the openness of China though. Go and ask them about being open to acknowledging Taiwan and Tibet, them jailing the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize Winner Liu Xiaobo, etc... oh Thom, you kill me.


I'm not comparing their openness. I'm actually contrasting them. China is not open and free, but is honest about that. They don't claim to be a free and open nation. The US, on the other hand, claims to be free and open, while in fact they're decidedly not.

Tell me - which is easier to work with and trust - a country you know is not free and open but doesn't claim to be, or a country which claims to be free and open but in fact isn't?

Edited 2011-02-08 14:02 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Lastly, of course the US has invasion plans to a lot of countries, but that's what you do with a massive defense budget. I think it's done more of an exercise so the US can think as devious as any other country that might want to invade the US.


It's more than plans actually. It's a law. Ever heard of the The Hague Invasion Act?

Can you blame me for mistrusting a nation that has a law which orders them to invade my own country (a supposed ally) if the International Criminal Court - a widely recognised UN body - were to ever hold an American soldier? Until said act is repealed, I, as a Dutch citizen, have every reason to consider the US government a threat to the sovereignty and safety of my own country.

Reply Parent Score: 3

earksiinni Member since:
2009-03-27

Ever heard of the Kellogg-Briand Pact? Unless the Netherlands attacks the US, I'm pretty sure that you have nothing to worry about.

Savor the taste of my double irony, sir.

Reply Parent Score: 1