Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 9th Feb 2011 00:04 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Speaking of Nokia - Engadget got their hands on what is supposedly an internal memo sent to Nokia employees by the company's new CEO. It's... Brutal. As in, brutally honest. There's no sugar-coating here, no unicorns, no glitter. "Nokia, our platform is burning." Update: Android is probably out of the question. Will it be Windows Phone 7, after all? Damn; Palm tonight, Nokia Friday - what a week for mobile! Update: The "Communities Dominate Brands" blog published an in-depth analysis of the memo, which claims with sound arguments that it might well be a hoax.
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Fergy
Member since:
2006-04-10

information = marketing.
Hide the bad information and make the good one in every people's head. That is good marketing. If the information provided to you is that the product is awesome, you will buy it. If the product has defects but you don't know it, or they make you think those defects are not important or that they are feature, you buy.

But that would mean that every piece of information is provided by the right source. That is a pretty big conspiracy. And also really weird that you wouldn't find the flaws after buying the product.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

Marketing isn't strictly an active process. There's a lot of subconscious stuff going on that you're unaware of. If two people held up the same phone, without saying a single word, you'd buy the phone from the most attractive of the two - whether the people are from your preferred sex or not.

Even something as simple as how often a brand appears around you influences you without you really knowing it. Heck, it has been consistently proven - time and time again - that a guy wearing a labcoat will always be considered more trustworthy than someone who doesn't, even if they say the exact same things and are the exact same person.

These are processes you yourself do not actively control. There's countless of them.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Fergy Member since:
2006-04-10

These are processes you yourself do not actively control. There's countless of them.

Which would mean that there is no free will. As far as I have read you have no free will at the moment but you do have free will in the long term. Now I understand that as you can make a lot of small unimportant choices(like reading a review) to prepare you for the important ones.
Marketing tries to prepare you for the important choice but _you_ can also prepare for the important choice. I think my preparation is stronger than marketing's preparation.

Do you have a way of testing my decision making skills? Or are we all at the mercy of the marketing people?

Reply Parent Score: 2

spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

But that would mean that every piece of information is provided by the right source. That is a pretty big conspiracy. And also really weird that you wouldn't find the flaws after buying the product.

That is called marketing. You can call it conspiracy too.
99% of the people who buy won't admit mistake, go with the flow and praise the product. Anyway, they have this product so they don't know if other products are better. They compare it with their previous product that is obsolete and think they made a good deal. People are proud to show their iPhone and how they can facetime. They don't even know that every modern phone can do it. Marketing is about creating a flow of people praising the product. Apple managed to create one that feeds itself. They are very good at it.

Edited 2011-02-09 10:43 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

Carewolf Member since:
2005-09-08

No, it is not a conspiracy. It is human nature and game theory. If you make people believe you are a big player, they will treat you like a big player.

Apple makes sure to make a splash with everything they do. While Nokia is constantly treated like an unknown by the US media. This is in turns feeds other media. If you buy enough media, the network effect will make all the independent media follow the seemingly lead.

If the other news-media thinks this is important, then it is important. If the users thinks this is hip, we have to say it is hip, otherwise we are contradicting out readers. So all you need to do is convince the journalists that
1) Everybody thinks this is important
2) All you readers already loves it, and talking against it will cause disonence with your audience.

Super-simple. No conspiracy, just "evil"-ish manipulation with the journalists perception of reality. Journalist oriented marketing ;)

Edited 2011-02-09 14:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4