Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 9th Feb 2011 23:29 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems And, of course, just as I decide to leave the live blogging to play a game of Left 4 Dead 2, HP drops the big bombshell right at the end of their press event: webOS is coming to PCs!
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RE[2]: Comment by Laurence
by Laurence on Thu 10th Feb 2011 01:26 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by Laurence"
Laurence
Member since:
2007-03-26


I agree with the article that this will be for the consumer devices only, so who cares about the speed of the underlying language? Consumers generally only need computers for web, email and maybe a bit of social networking. If they do play games then on an OS like WebOS it's more likely to be casual games.

That's not entirely true though. If consumers buy a laptop / desktop, then it's because they wanted/needed to do more than just go online or play a few games.
It's because - and at the very minimum of their usage - they have letters to type, personal accounts to tabulate or photos to crop and print.
Many might have software they need for work - from interactive whiteboards to bespoke solutions. Or perhaps they're studying at college / university and want to run the same software suites at home.

The fact is, most people who buy a laptop or desktop do so intentionally because they want the potential flexibility that comes with a fully-fledged desktop OS. Thus if they only wanted to surf the web or play games, they'd buy a tablet PC (and we've seen proof of this with how popular internet-ready gadgets have been of late). WebOS just can't compete with OS X terms of productivity thus suggesting WebOS is part of HPs plans to phase out Windows and become HP's own Mac OS - as Thom suggested - is completely bonkers.

Obviously there will be people who just want to browser some HTML yet will still prefer a laptop. There will always be exceptions to the rule. However while the majority of people only surf the net the majority of the time; I think it's grossly unfair to say that's all they do all the time.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by Laurence
by Moochman on Thu 10th Feb 2011 04:10 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Laurence"
Moochman Member since:
2005-07-06

Generally, I tend agree with you, but your examples are really weak. "they have letters to type, personal accounts to tabulate or photos to crop and print." These are all things that webOS could easily excel at. Heck, have you taken a survey of all the online office suites and photo-management tools out now? Many of them approach the functionality and power of native software--and manage to perform snappily while they're at it.

For "creatives" such as myself (a developer and sometimes musician) it will be a long time before the traditional desktop can be replaced. For many average use cases however the barriers are blurring fast.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Comment by Laurence
by nt_jerkface on Thu 10th Feb 2011 16:56 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by Laurence"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Heck, have you taken a survey of all the online office suites and photo-management tools out now? Many of them approach the functionality and power of native software--and manage to perform snappily while they're at it.


Have you seen how people take photos these days? They take high res shots and then fill those 300gb drives that have become standard on laptops. What do you expect consumers to do? Upload these massive archives and then use an online editor to manipulate 10mb files? That would just seem slloooowww and I'm sure those online tools have file size limits.

Client applications are refined and readily available and browsers are free, consumers should be left to choose how much they want to use the web. Cloud-centric operating systems are a step backwards.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by Laurence
by daedalus on Thu 10th Feb 2011 08:54 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Laurence"
daedalus Member since:
2011-01-14

I'm not so sure about consumers needing to do their accounts etc. I guess it boils down to which consumers you know. I know I need a lot of flexibility from a computer, but I know plenty of people who buy laptops because they find their phone is too small for using Facebook, and because Farmville or Cafe World doesn't work on their phones. That's all. For these people, all they need is a web browser, a Flash implementation, and some way of uploading photos from their camera to Facebook. The only reason they use Windows is because Macs are too expensive and that's what their laptop came with. WebOS or Android would be great alternatives for these people who "need" a proper keyboard and decent sized screen so they can keep an eye on their cafe customers while watching tv.

Reply Parent Score: 1