Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 10th Feb 2011 10:45 UTC
Internet & Networking Absolutely fantastic article over at Ars about a guy trying to hunt down Anonymous - which cost him and his company dearly. "Aaron Barr believed he had penetrated Anonymous. The loose hacker collective had been responsible for everything from anti-Scientology protests to pro-Wikileaks attacks on MasterCard and Visa, and the FBI was now after them. But matching their online identities to real-world names and locations proved daunting. Barr found a way to crack the code. [...] But had he?" A comment to the article says it best: "Personally, I'm rooting for Anonymous. I may not care for their attitude or their methods sometimes, but I think a little fear and caution on the worst excesses of those who would impair our rights is good thing." Governments and companies should fear the people - not the other way around.
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RE[6]: Governments
by umccullough on Thu 10th Feb 2011 18:14 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Governments "
umccullough
Member since:
2006-01-26

In fact, if anyone would spout that crap, the person I'd least expect to hear it from would be a geek on an IT news forum.


As a geek in an IT news forum, I'm here to warn you that our lives are being run for us these days - we have little control over what happens, and we better prepare for the worst - as this virtual world that runs us is more dynamic than we can imagine. Can you sustain your own life daily without the internet and all the convenience that it provides?

I'm not being alarmist, just realistic, too many people have become dependent and complacent.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[7]: Governments
by Laurence on Thu 10th Feb 2011 18:19 in reply to "RE[6]: Governments "
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Well that was my whole point.

People say "it's only virtual, it doesn't matter", but the reality is our lives are governed by this "irrelevant virtual shit".

I'm not about to say that virtual stuff matters more than physical stuff - however our dependance on virtual data makes it every bit as relevant as bricks and mortar

Edited 2011-02-10 18:19 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Governments
by umccullough on Thu 10th Feb 2011 18:33 in reply to "RE[7]: Governments "
umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

Well that was my whole point.

People say "it's only virtual, it doesn't matter", but the reality is our lives are governed by this "irrelevant virtual shit".

I'm not about to say that virtual stuff matters more than physical stuff - however our dependance on virtual data makes it every bit as relevant as bricks and mortar


The takeaway lesson is supposed to be: Reduce your dependence on "virtual shit" and get your head out of the clouds (double meaning bonus!)

I'm the only person I know who doesn't carry a cell phone 24x7... that scares me. I don't even own a cell phone (although, my wife owns two pay-as-you-go phones).

I won't pretend that the internet isn't a major part of my daily life (both at work, and at home), but this "always connected" lifestyle is disturbing when one realizes how dependent people have become on it. I've stepped back and analyzed my dependence on the internet and virtual infrastructure, and it's scary. I hate that feeling - I try to take minimal steps all the time to reduce my dependence, not increase it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Governments
by bryanv on Fri 11th Feb 2011 17:31 in reply to "RE[6]: Governments "
bryanv Member since:
2005-08-26

Prior to the recent crazy ice storm, I evaluated my family survival position.


Yes, we're prepared. Barring a nuclear assault on tier-3 strategic targets.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: Governments
by Soulbender on Fri 11th Feb 2011 21:46 in reply to "RE[6]: Governments "
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Can you sustain your own life daily without the internet and all the convenience that it provides?


Yes, it's not that hard but since I have the choice I'd rather not.

Reply Parent Score: 2