Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 10th Feb 2011 10:45 UTC
Internet & Networking Absolutely fantastic article over at Ars about a guy trying to hunt down Anonymous - which cost him and his company dearly. "Aaron Barr believed he had penetrated Anonymous. The loose hacker collective had been responsible for everything from anti-Scientology protests to pro-Wikileaks attacks on MasterCard and Visa, and the FBI was now after them. But matching their online identities to real-world names and locations proved daunting. Barr found a way to crack the code. [...] But had he?" A comment to the article says it best: "Personally, I'm rooting for Anonymous. I may not care for their attitude or their methods sometimes, but I think a little fear and caution on the worst excesses of those who would impair our rights is good thing." Governments and companies should fear the people - not the other way around.
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RE[9]: Governments
by HunterA3 on Fri 11th Feb 2011 15:36 UTC in reply to "RE[8]: Governments "
HunterA3
Member since:
2005-10-19

I sure hope that you don't use direct deposit, debit or credit cards, or even have a bank account because guess what? They use Internet technology to transfer funds. So does any government service that you are required to use. Not having a cell phone, or using a PC, is only the part of the iceberg showing. The rest is below the surface and you would be best served to recognize that. Unless you live in the mountains, completely self-sustained, you are more connected than you realize.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[10]: Governments
by umccullough on Fri 11th Feb 2011 16:41 in reply to "RE[9]: Governments "
umccullough Member since:
2006-01-26

I sure hope that you don't use direct deposit, debit or credit cards, or even have a bank account because guess what? They use Internet technology to transfer funds.


Yes, I'm well aware. Fortunately my finances are in pretty good shape - I keep a bit of cash in my safe. In the event of a major economic/financial disaster, however, I'm not sure that money will be worth much. At that point, the economy is likely to fall back to currencies such as gold/silver, and bartering. I am an extremely versatile person, experienced in all aspects of life - building/repairing homes, repairing cars, some aspects of farming and hunting, etc. I suspect if it comes down to bartering, I can survive.

So does any government service that you are required to use. Not having a cell phone, or using a PC, is only the part of the iceberg showing. The rest is below the surface and you would be best served to recognize that. Unless you live in the mountains, completely self-sustained, you are more connected than you realize.


I do live in the "mountains" - I have a small chunk of land, can raise and butcher my own livestock, and can grow my own food if I must. Due to my constant power outages each winter (sometimes up to a week at a time), I am setup to sustain myself without power as well.

I also own several guns - which are going to be important items to have in the event of a "virtual failure"... I do try to plan ahead, for the potential worst. If it never happens in my lifetime, great! At least my children will learn something from it.

That said, I work in the valley, in a suburb to a large California city, and it almost pains me to watch people there live a completely different, sheltered life. To Each Their Own, I suppose.

As I said, I'm not alarmist, but realistic. There's always the possibility - but I also believe that in the event of an infrastructure failure, it will only be temporary. As long as I can survive for a few weeks or months on my own, I think I'll be far ahead of the majority of people out there.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[11]: Governments
by Laurence on Fri 11th Feb 2011 19:13 in reply to "RE[10]: Governments "
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

This thread has taken a turn for the weird

Reply Parent Score: 2