Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 11th Feb 2011 11:35 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless A lot of people are wondering why Nokia didn't choose to go with Android. How can Nokia differentiate themselves when Android is a lot more open and free than Windows Phone 7? As usual, the key to this is in the details. If you read the announcements carefully, you'll see that Microsoft offered Nokia something Google most likely didn't. Update: What a surprise. Elop just confirmed Nokia has a special deal with Microsoft. Whereas HTC, Samsung, and so on are not allowed to customise WP7 - Nokia is, further confirming my theory.
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nt_jerkface
Member since:
2009-08-26

The main benefit is not encouraging a 2 party market.

By using WP7 they can get a good deal with MS for a cut of the profits while not encouraging further adoption of Android. They can take advantage of MS and use WP7 to divide the market. A fragmented market would be much easier for them to enter later with their own OS than one dominated by two systems.

Hopefully they made a deal with MS to bring Qt to WP7.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Hopefully they made a deal with MS to bring Qt to WP7.

Somehow, I bet Elop has forgotten to ask for this in the negociations.

At the risk of sounding like a conspiracy theorist, this deal is extremely advantageous for MS, whereas for Nokia it only brings short-term benefits and is a disaster in the long run. So I have to wonder why Elop actually left Microsoft. Or, if you prefer, if he actually left the company.

Reply Parent Score: 5

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Somehow, I bet Elop has forgotten to ask for this in the negotiations.


Probably. As the CEO he likely doesn't care that much about Qt. MS on the other hand does not want to endorse or advertise Qt and would pay extra to not make this concession. But it's possible that Elop bargained to put whatever they want on WP7, including Qt and their own application store.

So I have to wonder why Elop actually left Microsoft. Or, if you prefer, if he actually left the company.


I think it is just another case of MS getting lucky. Elop also went to Google and they probably turned him down for a partnership.

Reply Parent Score: 2