Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 14th Feb 2011 22:50 UTC, submitted by gogothebee
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "I think that the advantages to Nokia are clear. Given the scant details revealed so far - perhaps no surprise given that nothing has been formalized just yet - Microsoft is the company in the more difficult position, and it has a lot of questions to answer."
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Good for Finland?
by shmerl on Mon 14th Feb 2011 23:04 UTC
shmerl
Member since:
2010-06-08

Many Nokia employees are pretty upset about this deal and don't consider it being good for Finland and Nokia. If anyone is loosing on it - it's Nokia who slows Meego and Symbian development because of it, and not Microsoft whose mobile market is miniscule in their total income.

Here is a nice historic overview of similar "strategic" deals and how they ended (:

http://www.asymco.com/2011/02/11/in-memoriam-microsofts-previous-st...

Reply Score: 7

RE: Good for Finland?
by sukru on Mon 14th Feb 2011 23:28 in reply to "Good for Finland?"
sukru Member since:
2006-11-19

While still giving some hope for this MS-Nokia cooperation, I'd agree that the article is not well written, and Finland will definitely lose, at least in the short term.

Nokia is hosting 2500 Symbian employees - if the reports are correct. Since Symbian OS will be on "maintenance only" mode, I'd obvious that most of these people will be let go.

In the future, it might make business better for Nokia, opening up jobs, but it's too early to tell.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Good for Finland?
by elsewhere on Tue 15th Feb 2011 05:06 in reply to "RE: Good for Finland?"
elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

While still giving some hope for this MS-Nokia cooperation, I'd agree that the article is not well written, and Finland will definitely lose, at least in the short term.

Nokia is hosting 2500 Symbian employees - if the reports are correct. Since Symbian OS will be on "maintenance only" mode, I'd obvious that most of these people will be let go.

In the future, it might make business better for Nokia, opening up jobs, but it's too early to tell.


Finland will lose for the long term as well. If Nokia is successful, then it means that they have effectively outsourced their software development (and thousands of jobs and sub-contracts) to Microsoft. If Nokia fails, then they lose even more jobs.

By the same token, this could be seen as a market correction. Nokia was clearly not being run effectively and a bit of a crash was inevitable. We went through something very similar in Canada, when Nortel came crashing down. Prior to their decline, Nortel / Northern Telecom was basically a Canadian blue chip company, so aside from the thousands of job losses, it had a devastating impact on the pensions and retirement funds for tens of thousands of people.

Oh, did I mention Nortel entered into a strategic partnership with Microsoft that was going to change the landscape of unified communications? You know, just before they tanked? But I digress...

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: Good for Finland?
by stabbyjones on Tue 15th Feb 2011 00:33 in reply to "Good for Finland?"
stabbyjones Member since:
2008-04-15

It's amazing that people still care about Symbian.

I have no doubt there's going to be a haiku/symbian project a few years after it's death. The only problem is Amiga was good at what they did while Symbian got left behind.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Good for Finland?
by shmerl on Tue 15th Feb 2011 01:26 in reply to "RE: Good for Finland?"
shmerl Member since:
2010-06-08

I guess Symbian developers are aught to care about it ;) Wouldn't you if you'll be one of them?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Good for Finland?
by adkilla on Tue 15th Feb 2011 06:56 in reply to "Good for Finland?"
adkilla Member since:
2005-07-07

It seems that a MeeGo powered handset was ready:
"This was not done as response to 'burning platforms' haha. It Stephen Elop did indeed discover a fire on the oil rig platform that is Nokia, he was not looking to shut the fire, it was Stephen Elop's own actions that poured gasoline to those burning flames - he wanted MeeGo out of the way - imagine the outrage, if MeeGo had been released on schedule in October 2010, the first handset released for the best Q4 Christmas sales period, and as this would have been significantly newer a phone, ie a better handset than the N8 - and on the better software, it could have easily outsold Microsoft's Phone 7 haha.. that would have been a horrible PR nightmare, why kill the new 'great'' MeeGo OS and replace it with Microsoft's 'worse' Phone 7 OS. That would have created huge outcries. But Stephen Elop knew what he needed to do, and to bring in Microsoft, he had to kill off MeeGo right away, so we never saw what it could do."

Taken from Tomi's blog:
http://communities-dominate.blogs.com/brands/2011/02/nokia-autopsy-...

Reply Parent Score: 5