Linked by sawboss on Mon 14th Feb 2011 23:09 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems "The name Snapdragon is fast becoming well-known among consumers as the chip to have inside your smartphone. Offering speeds of up to 1.5GHz at the moment, it's certainly one of the fastest mobile chips out there. Qualcomm doesn't want the reputation of Snapdragon to falter, though, so the chip manufacturer has just announced an update that will have smartphone and tablet users drooling. The next iteration of the Snapdragon processor line is codenamed Krait and uses 28nm manufacturing technology. It will be offered in single, dual, and quad-core versions with clock speeds up to 2.5GHz. If the huge increase in performance wasn’t enough for you, Qualcomm also boast a 65% reduction in power use over existing mobile ARM chips."
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Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

To become a competitor to the PC platform, ARM still have to get some standardized desktop architecture, though.

So far, the only thing standard in the ARM ecosystem is the instruction set... Err... Wait a minute... Which of the available instructions sets by the way ? If you only take the A-series, there are already four of them ;)

Edited 2011-02-15 08:08 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

That's one of the plus points of VM based environments.

Keep the bytecode as executable file format and let the VM/JIT care about the proper instruction set.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

You can just as well re-build code which is not based on a VM if it's designed with portability in mind to start with.

But this is more of a duck-taped workaround than a real solution. You move the complexity of adaptation to multiple nonstandard hardware to the VM or the compiler, which means making it much more complicated, and thus potentially slower, more buggy and in the case of a VM less secure.

Edited 2011-02-15 10:14 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

viton Member since:
2005-08-09

A-series are ARMv7.
Cortex-M microcontrollers feature Thumb2, but not ARM instruction set. But these should not be compatible with A-series, because this is entirely different market.
I don't think ARM for desktop will be available before ARMv8. It would be stupid to change ISA right after the beginning of possible "desktop intervention".

Edited 2011-02-15 13:31 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Well, from what I rode when I had a look at the ARM manual some times ago, inside ARMv7 there are four separate instruction sets : ARM, Thumb, Jazelle, and a fourth one whose name I have forgotten.

Support for each of those was apparently optional, as it could be probed via CPUID.

Reply Parent Score: 1

dsmogor Member since:
2005-09-01

I think the shapes of a Quallcom/NVidia/Omap war destined to fragment the platform slowly reveal.

All of them support different extensions for doing basically the same.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

I think the shapes of a Quallcom/NVidia/Omap war destined to fragment the platform slowly reveal.

All of them support different extensions for doing basically the same.

I wonder... We've already seen this very thing happening on x86 with accelerated graphics and network cards.

After years of crappy drivers and an endless amount of duplicated work, we have only recently started to recover from this mess, with vendors taking the first steps towards a potential future standardization by opening up their proprietary specs.

Aren't we supposed to learn lessons from the past or something ?

Edited 2011-02-15 17:44 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Oh, speaking of ARM vs x86, just discovered this while looking around on youtube...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UiQ0AnlfBu4

If I did not knew how crappy Atoms are at running recent games, I'd be quite impressed. Nice concept, Razer guys !

Edited 2011-02-15 20:14 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1