Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 15th Feb 2011 15:49 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "Yesterday I did my last look at the past, about how the decision was made by Nokia to terminate its smartphone OS platforms etc. That is all water under the bridge. There is no going back. Time to look into the future. And while my instant reaction on Twitter may have been a bit hasty and negative about Nokia-Microsoft partnership for smartphones, I have now done my first full, comprehensive analysis of its near term potential. And I am sorry to tell you, I was too optimistic over the weekend. It is far worse. I will go through every relevant part and analyze it. So lets look at 2011 and beyond, for Nokisoft Microkia."
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Comment by darai
by Darai on Tue 15th Feb 2011 17:16 UTC
Darai
Member since:
2009-09-09

I would have to agree with with one commenter from that analysis:

"But I really do wish that Symbian would be just pushed down to feature phone level, then Nokia would kill S40. considering that prices of hardware gradually falls, it's possible to produce a Symbian "dumbphone" under $100 by the end of the year."

Also, what would happen to Ovi, since Nokia will be running Marketplace instead?

Reply Score: 1

RE: Comment by darai
by mappy on Tue 15th Feb 2011 18:49 in reply to "Comment by darai"
mappy Member since:
2010-06-02

Aside from no multitasking and no native apps, S40 isn't that primitive - have you seen the Nokia C3, for instance? It stacks up quite well with wifi and opera mini (and it's unbelievably cheap)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by darai
by Darai on Tue 15th Feb 2011 19:41 in reply to "RE: Comment by darai"
Darai Member since:
2009-09-09

And I agree. But isn't S40 more or less feels like a stripped down version of Symbian anyway?

And it isn't like featurephones aren't going to stop selling, so what does Nokia have to lose?

TBH, I think it'd be a great idea shift Symbian down into feature phones, which would give the full Symbian experience, rather than just part of it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Comment by darai
by Morty on Wed 16th Feb 2011 08:08 in reply to "Comment by darai"
Morty Member since:
2005-07-06

Also, what would happen to Ovi, since Nokia will be running Marketplace instead?


Obviusly Ovi will continue to go strong, Nokia has 200 million symbian devices in the market and they count on selling 150 million more. Recent numbers from Nokia shows lots of downloads from Ovi, so abandoning it does not make any economic sense. It would be like throwing away "free" money.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Comment by darai
by arpan on Wed 16th Feb 2011 08:49 in reply to "Comment by darai"
arpan Member since:
2006-07-30

That makes perfect sense and I do not know why Nokia isn't doing that.

Windows Phone 7 requires a large high-res screen and a fast processor. So it can only be used in mid to high-end smartphones.

In addition, Nokia's Windows phone devices aren't going to be ready for around a year.

So, they could continue to develop Symbian towards the lower-end, that would allow them to continue selling Symbian phones, and slowly transition that towards the low-end.

So, Symbian phones would be low to mid range, while Windows phones would be mid to high-end, allowing Nokia to compete against Android and iPhone at all price ranges, and prevent their current customers from abandoning Symbian for Android while Nokia gets it's act together.

By announcing EOL for Symbian, they are basically discouraging users from purchasing any Nokia smart phones.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by darai
by vodoomoth on Wed 16th Feb 2011 12:56 in reply to "RE: Comment by darai"
vodoomoth Member since:
2010-03-30

In addition, Nokia's Windows phone devices aren't going to be ready for around a year.

How do you know that? I've seen leaked photographs of Nokia devices running WP7 on either Ars or Engagdget just yesterday or the day before. Unless these are mock-ups, your assertion there doesn't hold.

By announcing EOL for Symbian, they are basically discouraging users from purchasing any Nokia smart phones.

Yes, but not all users given the rate at which people change phones. But even more importantly is (as several people commented on the Qt blog article that reiterated Nokia's support after the February 11th announcement) that they are effectively sending most developers away.

Edited 2011-02-16 13:02 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2