Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 16th Feb 2011 19:30 UTC
Google "Hot on the heels of Apple's subscription service announcement, Google has lifted the curtain on its own offering that will allow publishers to set a price for recurring content delivered via your Google login. The payment system is called 'One Pass', and it allows publishers to offer not only subscriptions, but also metered access, 'freemium' content, and even individual articles. So far, One Pass seems more flexible than Apple's offering, and the company will likely take a much smaller cut from publishers than Apple will."
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FrankenFuss
Member since:
2009-08-05

What is the big problem with making sure advertising is targeted instead of random?


Gee...how about the option of not having my information sold to third parties if I don't wish to? What about my right to control some aspects of the info I want released online? I'd thought you'd be all for that..but then, I remembered, Google is for releasing it...so whatever Google does is good by you.

Edited 2011-02-16 23:06 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

Praxis Member since:
2009-09-17

[q]What is the big problem with making sure advertising is targeted instead of random?


Gee...how about the option of not having my information sold to third parties if I don't wish to? What about my right to control some aspects of the info I want released online? I'd thought you'd be all for that..but then, I remembered, Google is for releasing it...so whatever Google does is good by you.


There is an opt-out. And don't forget Apple runs an ad network as well. There aren't protecting your data, their keeping it for themselves. They love profit to much to let stuff that valuable slip through their fingers.

And who is the third party your talking about Google passing info too. The app your buying the subscription from? Hardly a third party.

Under the Apple system, you are seen as Apple's customer first and thus they control your information. Under the Google system your seen as the publishers customer first and they control your information. Opt-out are possible under both systems, well opt-out to the publisher, Apple and Google handle the transaction in both cases so they see everything, and what is seen is never forgotten.

Personally I find the repercussions of Apple's 30% share in all in-app purchases throughout all apps and how that will effect the competitiveness of the market place far more worring than clicking an opt-out button once in a while or *gasp* someone knowing my demographic information. Just my priorities I guess, yours may differ.

Edited 2011-02-17 02:26 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

mrhasbean Member since:
2006-04-03

LOL. What a load of .... You're kidding right? Ok, I understand this might be a hard concept to grasp for people who expect everything for nothing, so let me spell it out for you.

Present situation - you take a subscription to a magazine / newspaper / book club. The item is supplied by the "publisher", but in order to supply that item it has to be printed, packaged and delivered. At every point along the line those people are making a percentage of the value of the item. Even in the case of newspapers where they print their own there are associated costs with that printing, and then there's cost associated with delivery.

Why the hell should it be any different just because the item is being delivered digitally? So Apple make 30%. I GUARANTEE there are big content providers who they've already been working with on this for some time who are VERY happy with that 30%. Do you know how much Audible have been taking from the audiobook producers for YEARS? 45%+, and if Audible want to whack your $30 audiobook into a $7 a month subscription you get 55% of the $7, and you don't have a choice. Hows them apples?

Just as has been commented on another story here, if it's Apple it has to be shit, if it's Android it has to be excellent.

Reply Parent Score: 2

A420X Member since:
2011-02-02


Gee...how about the option of not having my information sold to third parties if I don't wish to? What about my right to control some aspects of the info I want released online?


+1 Targeted ads are one of those weird things that we accept online but find objectionable in real life.

It's nice when there are systems in place to control it but it would be better if we didn't have to worry about it in the first place.

It's not that I have anything to hide, I have a very mundane Internet history, much like I buy and am interested in pretty normal things offline.

Still, I would be a little concerned if someone started keeping track of my purchases and actions on the street, and don't see how the absence of a physical presence should negate the respect for privacy we have deemed acceptable in normal interactions.

Reply Parent Score: 2