Linked by Eugenia Loli on Thu 17th Feb 2011 00:14 UTC
Apple Well, it might be safe to say that Apple's own engineers stopped testing their Apple apps with 3.x iOS devices, and have created bugs that make these apps unusable. This is to be somewhat expected, Apple has a track record of not-so-great backwards compatibility (on the Mac), but what we also expected was to not get these broken updates forced to us. It's one thing to stop updating the firmware of older iOS models, and another thing breaking them.
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kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

First of all, no one in this thread has mentioned Android nor compared Android phones to Iphones. Furthermore, there happen to be several other smartphone OSs that are non-Apple. I own a Palm Treo that is three years old and still going strong. It's very solid, and I intend to use it for many years to come.


I raised it because Android is the second option in the marketplace at the moment until WP7 is more widely spread around the world and on more networks. If you're going to complain about something then it should be only fair to benchmark it against something which in my case I use iOS's greatest competitor, Android, as that benchmark. If you're going to complain you never are going to complain about something in a vacuum - it'll be based off a culmination of experiences in the past and what exists today. When I praise Mac OS X, I don't do it in a vacuum I do it based on my past experiences using a variety of operating systems - my evaluation therefore never occurs in a vacuum.

Secondly, the author has explained in this thread that the problem with her Apple device is not exactly a lack of support -- the problem is support that actually breaks her Apple device. Google, Apple and others may abandon support for their devices, but bricking those devices for their unsuspecting owners is something else entirely.


She has a buggy application - her whole device didn't 'brick'. A bricked device would mean her whole operating system image was corrupted in some way and is unable to either boot or recovered. From what I read it was a buggy application due to some shoddy testing and setup at Apple's end but then again I guess I'm lucky that I'm happy to upgrade every 2-3 years.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Eugenia Member since:
2005-06-28

>If you're going to complain about something then it should be only fair to benchmark it against something which in my case I use iOS's greatest competitor, Android

Sure, no problem. Google's own apps and services still work without a problem on Android 1.5 phones, an OS version released in April 2009 (which is the OLDEST version of Android still out there on handsets). Remember, the problematic iOS 3.1.2 firmware version is NEWER than Android 1.5. It is NOT a matter of how old the handset is, but how old the firmware is, because the bugs I see are software-related, not driver/hardware-based.

So, going back to Android, the new Android versions of these apps were released by Google, but they were not forced on these older handsets, they only made available on the new firmware versions only (versions that the software was actually tested on). I ask nothing more of Apple too.

>it was a buggy application due to some shoddy testing and setup at Apple's end

It is your right to see the issue as a simple bug awaiting fixing, but I don't share your opinion. One after the other the Apple apps are reproducibly broken on these older devices (2 official Apple apps in 1.5 months), so I see this as the beginning of the end. Sure the OS might still load, but if most of your apps don't work anymore, what good is it? It'd be practically-speaking, a brick. We're not at that point yet, but if this trends continues, and Apple/devs are not more careful on how they mark their apps compatible as, these devices will be practically unusable in just a few short months.

Edited 2011-02-17 07:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6

t3RRa Member since:
2005-11-22

Just one thing came into my mind that the newer release date of the firmware does not necessarily means it is more compatible. But rather API/ABI/Library compatibilities do. So there might be more difference between iOS 3.1.2 and 4.1.x than between Android 1.5 and 1.6. That is what major and minor numberings are for.

Reply Parent Score: 1

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Sure, no problem. Google's own apps and services still work without a problem on Android 1.5 phones, an OS version released in April 2009 (which is the OLDEST version of Android still out there on handsets). Remember, the problematic iOS 3.1.2 firmware version is NEWER than Android 1.5. It is NOT a matter of how old the handset is, but how old the firmware is, because the bugs I see are software-related, not driver/hardware-based.


But even then there are applications that didn't transition so well from interpreted to JIT - I can't name the exact names but I do remember people running Android 2.2 and finding that some 1.6 applications didn't run so well. As noted in another post I made, they need to have a minimum required so that updates aren't offered to customers running older iOS versions where the newer version of the application requires a newer version to function properly.

So, going back to Android, the new Android versions of these apps were released by Google, but they were not forced on these older handsets, they only made available on the new firmware versions only (versions that the software was actually tested on). I ask nothing more of Apple too.


Agreed.

It is your right to see the issue as a simple bug awaiting fixing, but I don't share your opinion. One after the other the Apple apps are reproducibly broken on these older devices (2 official Apple apps in 1.5 months), so I see this as the beginning of the end. Sure the OS might still load, but if most of your apps don't work anymore, what good is it? It'd be practically-speaking, a brick. We're not at that point yet, but if this trends continues, and Apple/devs are not more careful on how they mark their apps compatible as, these devices will be practically unusable in just a few short months.


But hang on for a second, lets back up the car and look at the situation - you're running a device that is over 4 years old, I'd say that is pretty damn good if you ask me where most people would have updated already. This goes back to what I said about Android and why I raised it; with Apple you got 4 years of functionality out of a device and in the case of an Android device it is a 'brick' within 6 months. I can understand your frustration regarding the application but I'm confused how you consider a device 4 years old not a good indication of a company actually giving a flying continental about its customers.

Reply Parent Score: 2