Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 16th Feb 2011 23:02 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "There's just one problem, though: the 'nine young investors' don't really exist - according to the last tweet on the @NokiaPlanB Twitter account, it was all a hoax perpetuated by 'one very bored engineer who really likes his iPhone'. Ouch."
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RE: I like WP7
by drahca on Thu 17th Feb 2011 14:34 UTC in reply to "I like WP7"
drahca
Member since:
2006-02-23

So to conclude, I believe that Nokia have made an extremely good decision, they get an extremely capable platform and potentially the biggest developer crowd, how is that not a win??


I do not think anyone is arguing that the .Net platform is not a good platform. I program in Qt daily and while Qt is great C++ really isn't. QML however is great and I believe is great tool to build mobile phone applications with.

The future of phones is however commoditization. This will mean that the phones themselves will over time become commodities as PCs more or less are now. The added value will be in the software running on the phones and the services provided on the phone ecosystem. Apple understands this as can be seen on their relentless focus on their App store, iTunes etc.

Nokia did not just announce that they will ship phones with WM7, they actually deprecated their current platforms killing them and their application store instantly. This is something you should never openly announce until you have an actual shipping alternative and a migration path for developers to follow, as Qt was giving developers from Symbian to Meego. Also, the first WM7 phone will probably not come out until late 2011 or early 2012, leaving two whole years for Nokia to survive without a primary platform at all.

In the long term they are cutting costs and basically outsourcing their entire software development to Microsoft and their hardware production to China. This will have dire consequences for all the people working in Finland. They should have focused on retaining the R&D for software and hardware and the talented engineers in Finland. Nokia will become an empty shell of its former self. Every talented engineer will leave and seek opportunities elsewhere.

Also the Nokia management was the major factor in bringing Nokia into its current predicament. Is the management being reorganized at all? At least Nokia's lack of focus is being addressed. Hopefully they will not try to change platforms yet again in the future.

So how will Nokia earn money in the future? Will they get a big piece of the WP7/8/9 application store pie? "In Microsoft we trust" is an adage which has been proven false multiple times.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: I like WP7
by JohnJJ on Thu 17th Feb 2011 15:23 in reply to "RE: I like WP7"
JohnJJ Member since:
2011-01-28

I do not think anyone is arguing that the .Net platform is not a good platform.


No, but plenty of people are arguing that WP7 is a bad choice, but I'm not sure that Nokia had other viable alternatives.

Symbian is apparently not a very attractive platform and it has failed to deliver a proper user experience.

MeeGo is still not ready for prime time and it is uncertain when it will be ready. Betting on it could be dangerous.

iOS is of course not an option.

Choosing Android would give them a popular platform, but they would be just as much at the mercy of Google as all the other Android vendors currently are. Also maybe they feel, as many people suggest, that it would make them just another Android company.

WP7 is new, but has already established itself as a good platform and with the announces that MS just made, which Nokia have surely known about, it looks to be competitive with iOs and Android, feature wise, before the end of the year.
So I find that Nokias choice makes perfect sense.

I do however agree that they could have handled the annoucement better. It looks like Symbian is still going to be the basis for the lower end phones, so scaring off developers is probably not a good idea.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[3]: I like WP7
by _txf_ on Thu 17th Feb 2011 16:14 in reply to "RE[2]: I like WP7"
_txf_ Member since:
2008-03-17


MeeGo is still not ready for prime time and it is uncertain when it will be ready. Betting on it could be dangerous.


According to some, the platform was ready last year as it was harmattan/meego. What nokia feared was that there wouldn't be any apps ready for it. They also had no confidence in their ability to attract talent to the platform (despite the ready willingness of thousands of Qt developers and a couple of companies).

They chose the easy way out by leaving MS to do the hard work of attracting developers. They could have chosen to scrap it out with meego.



Choosing Android would give them a popular platform, but they would be just as much at the mercy of Google as all the other Android vendors currently are.

But now they are at the mercy of MS. Not only is the development environment completely closed, but they also have to pay to have access to the OS.

They said that they didn't want become a commodity hardware maker but inevitably that is what they will have to become even with WP7 in order to compete on price against android phones. Unless of course MS find some way to justify any premium one would pay for WP7 phones.


I do however agree that they could have handled the annoucement better. It looks like Symbian is still going to be the basis for the lower end phones, so scaring off developers is probably not a good idea.


Indeed. I still fail to see what they are going to use to replace symbian. They can't stick WP7 on lower end phones and S40 sucks. If they do stick WP7 on cheap phones then they also lose any premium appeal they need if they don't want to become a commodity hardware maker.

Reply Parent Score: 3