Linked by Hadrien Grasland on Thu 17th Feb 2011 17:49 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless So the writing is on the wall. In a very bold move, Nokia's new CEO, Stephen Elop, has decided to fully ditch Nokia's migration plan for the past few years and have the company embrace his former employer's operating system, Windows Phone 7, instead. This noticeably implied getting rid of two competitors, Symbian and the upcoming MeeGo, which were both put on the road to slow death. This article aims at saying goodbye to an old citizen of the mobile space who's now heading to its grave: Symbian. (Warning: Rant ahead)
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Comment by mrstep
by mrstep on Thu 17th Feb 2011 19:47 UTC
mrstep
Member since:
2009-07-18

I partly agree - I think the iPhone would be nicer if you could configure the lock screen to show summaries and allow some form of actions on them. The specific example seems a bit lacking, though. I know this is an extra step to take, but if I'm on my iPhone home screen, I can swipe or double-click to show the search and get a summary of contacts/mail/messages/whatever as soon as I start typing. It's an extra swipe, but not really too difficult.

But as I say, I think Apple could use a real summary lock screen (or even home screen with a swipe left for search / right for the apps type of thing...).

And I do think the entire move to Windows Phone 7 is going to be a disaster. Unfortunately for Nokia, they just seem to have been complacent and got overtaken coming & going (high and low end). The more I read about Elop, his stake in Microsoft, etc., the more odd hiring him and having him immediately do a big deal with his former employer seems at the very least to be a conflict of interest.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by mrstep
by Neolander on Thu 17th Feb 2011 20:33 in reply to "Comment by mrstep"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

I partly agree - I think the iPhone would be nicer if you could configure the lock screen to show summaries and allow some form of actions on them. The specific example seems a bit lacking, though. I know this is an extra step to take, but if I'm on my iPhone home screen, I can swipe or double-click to show the search and get a summary of contacts/mail/messages/whatever as soon as I start typing. It's an extra swipe, but not really too difficult.

Heh, I know that it's not extremely bad ;)

My point was that iOS is not optimized for communication, and it shows through a number of details. The "application heap" home screen where everything is accessed indirectly is one, there's also the late support for MMS, the very late (and still lacking) support for video calls, the perfectly useless lock screen that you mentioned, and I could also talk about more minor things like that terrible idea of putting the "call" button on the right in the dialer app...

These are all details, but they show that Apple did not optimize the communication experience on their platform. They rather worked on things like the multimedia experience, web browsing, and of course the app ecosystem.

I'm fine with that, they couldn't work on everything at once and please everyone. But my point was that precisely, they don't please everyone.

With Android and WP7 taking an iOS-like approach, and now the death of Symbian, the number of communication-centric OSs which work well on mid-end phones is shrinking. This is terrible news for some cellphone customers, because it means that there's less choice for those who, like me, send and receive thousands (!) of texts a month, mainly buy a cellphone for communication purposes, and just happen to like mobile apps as a cool extra (what's the point of a mail client if you can't save and open attachments ?)

Edited 2011-02-17 20:50 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by mrstep
by rhavyn on Thu 17th Feb 2011 21:20 in reply to "RE: Comment by mrstep"
rhavyn Member since:
2005-07-06

My point was that iOS is not optimized for communication, and it shows through a number of details. The "application heap" home screen where everything is accessed indirectly is one, there's also the late support for MMS, the very late (and still lacking) support for video calls, the perfectly useless lock screen that you mentioned, and I could also talk about more minor things like that terrible idea of putting the "call" button on the right in the dialer app...


Your definition of "communication" seems incredibly limited, but more in that in a moment.

The only "call" button in the Phone app on the iPhone is directly in the middle directly below the numeric buttons. It is also bright green. What call button are you talking about?

These are all details, but they show that Apple did not optimize the communication experience on their platform. They rather worked on things like the multimedia experience, web browsing, and of course the app ecosystem.

I'm fine with that, they couldn't work on everything at once and please everyone. But my point was that precisely, they don't please everyone.

With Android and WP7 taking an iOS-like approach, and now the death of Symbian, the number of communication-centric OSs which work well on mid-end phones is shrinking. This is terrible news for some cellphone customers, because it means that there's less choice for those who, like me, send and receive thousands (!) of texts a month, mainly buy a cellphone for communication purposes, and just happen to like mobile apps as a cool extra (what's the point of a mail client if you can't save and open attachments ?)


You've basically limited "communication" to your rather limited definition of SMS. For many people Facebook/Twitter/LinkedIn, etc are their primary communication vehicles. Email is a close second. How are the social networking clients on Symbian? Also, an iPhone can natively open attachments in these formats: ".jpg, .tiff, .gif (images); .doc and .docx (Microsoft Word); .htm and .html (web pages); .key (Keynote); .numbers (Numbers); .pages (Pages); .pdf (Preview and Adobe Acrobat); .ppt and .pptx (Microsoft PowerPoint); .txt (text); .rtf (rich text format); .vcf (contact information); .xls and .xlsx (Microsoft Excel)" And other applications can register to open attachments not in that list. Have you actually used an iPhone?

Reply Parent Score: 1