Linked by Hadrien Grasland on Thu 17th Feb 2011 17:49 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless So the writing is on the wall. In a very bold move, Nokia's new CEO, Stephen Elop, has decided to fully ditch Nokia's migration plan for the past few years and have the company embrace his former employer's operating system, Windows Phone 7, instead. This noticeably implied getting rid of two competitors, Symbian and the upcoming MeeGo, which were both put on the road to slow death. This article aims at saying goodbye to an old citizen of the mobile space who's now heading to its grave: Symbian. (Warning: Rant ahead)
Thread beginning with comment 462974
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[3]: Comment by mrstep
by Neolander on Thu 17th Feb 2011 21:36 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by mrstep"
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

The only "call" button in the Phone app on the iPhone is directly in the middle directly below the numeric buttons. It is also bright green. What call button are you talking about?

Forget that. I encountered a fake iOS dialer screenshot when looking for a suitable home screen screenshot for the article, apparently.

You've basically limited "communication" to your rather limited definition of SMS.

Not exactly, was thinking about SMS, MMS, e-mails, and calls. But I see where you're heading...

For many people Facebook/Twitter/LinkedIn, etc are their primary communication vehicles. Email is a close second. How are the social networking clients on Symbian?

Afaik, there are some, like on every single mobile OS nowadays. I'm not interested in these things, so I can't tell.

But even if you're into social networking, iOS' user interface still integrates those means of communication just as poorly as it integrates other means of communication. I've heard there are some UI tweaks for Android (like Motoblur) which can integrate these better, though, so in this case the rest of the high-end smartphone world is not necessarily as bad.

Also, an iPhone can natively open attachments in these formats: ".jpg, .tiff, .gif (images); .doc and .docx (Microsoft Word); .htm and .html (web pages); .key (Keynote); .numbers (Numbers); .pages (Pages); .pdf (Preview and Adobe Acrobat); .ppt and .pptx (Microsoft PowerPoint); .txt (text); .rtf (rich text format); .vcf (contact information); .xls and .xlsx (Microsoft Excel)"

You should clarify "natively". In most people's mouth, "natively" means "out of the box". Only on Apple's website (where this list is from, as far as I remember... I think I've already seen it somewhere) can you find file formats which require a third-party app to be opened listed as "supported".

And other applications can register to open attachments not in that list. Have you actually used an iPhone?

Mostly played with an iPod touch. Toyed with an iPhone long enough to see that it worked in a very similar way and to wonder how people can claim that this is a phone. But for the nth time, I have different needs than the average iPhone/Android/WP7 buyer. Can't we just get over it ? iOS is best for you, fine. Just admit that it's not the perfect OS for everyone. Is it so hard ?

Edited 2011-02-17 21:47 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by mrstep
by t3RRa on Fri 18th Feb 2011 04:36 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by mrstep"
t3RRa Member since:
2005-11-22

So... without ever really tinkered with iPhone and comparing Symbian to iOS on iPhone...? Fine. But then most of people would not buy your words including me.

Can't we just get over it ? iOS is best for you, fine. Just admit that it's not the perfect OS for everyone. Is it so hard ?

Nothing is perfect at all. I find many people are happy with iPhone while also many people are happy with Symbian. And there also are people fine with either one.

So... Can't we just get over it? Symbian might be best for you, fine. Just admit that it's not the perfect OS for everyone. Is it so hard?

You should also listen to others.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Comment by mrstep
by Neolander on Fri 18th Feb 2011 07:14 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by mrstep"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

Nothing is perfect at all. I find many people are happy with iPhone while also many people are happy with Symbian. And there also are people fine with either one.

So... Can't we just get over it? Symbian might be best for you, fine. Just admit that it's not the perfect OS for everyone. Is it so hard?

Happy to see that you get it ;) Now, think about it : what is this article about ?

The loss of a mature OS is always terrible news, but it's even more terrible when it was one of the fews that didn't just look like the others and provided some interesting choice.

The original post's point was "oh, you know, that's not that bad, you can do it on iOS too". My point was "yes, I can do that on iOS and Android, and I could also fry eggs on a friend's Acer laptop when playing games on it, but there really are things better suited for these purposes, like Symbian (no, not for frying eggs)".

That's all ! I really can't see how we managed to get in such an argument.

I miss my OS, he likes his, and that's perfectly fine. This article (and the subsequent comment discussion) was just an attempt to make people like him understand why some people in the world are going to miss Symbian. Not to advocate that he should use it.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Comment by mrstep
by rhavyn on Fri 18th Feb 2011 05:38 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by mrstep"
rhavyn Member since:
2005-07-06

"For many people Facebook/Twitter/LinkedIn, etc are their primary communication vehicles. Email is a close second. How are the social networking clients on Symbian?

Afaik, there are some, like on every single mobile OS nowadays. I'm not interested in these things, so I can't tell.
"

But ... something like every 1 in 12 people on the planet visits Facebook every day. Lacking first class support for these sites basically means that Symbian is missing one of the biggest communication mediums on the planet. Ignoring that because you aren't interested is symptomatic of the kind of attitude that has caused Symbian to be in the position it is today.

But even if you're into social networking, iOS' user interface still integrates those means of communication just as poorly as it integrates other means of communication. I've heard there are some UI tweaks for Android (like Motoblur) which can integrate these better, though, so in this case the rest of the high-end smartphone world is not necessarily as bad.


iOS' user interface, as you pointed out in the article, is application specific not "communication" specific. The prominence of social networking applications in iOS is directly dependent on how prominently a user places it. Additionally, if the next version of iOS has something more like WebOS' notification system, it more or less completely eliminates your "communication focused" UI argument and it still completely decimates Symbian in user interface, ease of use and application development platform.

You should clarify "natively". In most people's mouth, "natively" means "out of the box". Only on Apple's website (where this list is from, as far as I remember... I think I've already seen it somewhere) can you find file formats which require a third-party app to be opened listed as "supported".


None of the file formats in that list require a third party application to open on either iOS or Mac OS X. Really, right out of the box you can open any of them.

"And other applications can register to open attachments not in that list. Have you actually used an iPhone?

Mostly played with an iPod touch. Toyed with an iPhone long enough to see that it worked in a very similar way and to wonder how people can claim that this is a phone. But for the nth time, I have different needs than the average iPhone/Android/WP7 buyer. Can't we just get over it ? iOS is best for you, fine. Just admit that it's not the perfect OS for everyone. Is it so hard ?
"

For the record, I'm not claiming iOS is best for anyone. I'm simply pointing out that you choose an incredibly narrow focus for criticizing it's UI, and that many of your criticisms seem based on a lack of knowledge of it's capabilities.

Symbian, on the other hand, is long past it's expiration date. EPOC32 was a terrible platform when Symbian was founded and it remained a terrible platform till today. Slapping Qt on top of it is simply putting lip stick on a pig. Nokia may not have made the best choice by picking WP7, but they certainly made the right choice by dumping Symbian.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Comment by mrstep
by Neolander on Fri 18th Feb 2011 07:26 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by mrstep"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

But ... something like every 1 in 12 people on the planet visits Facebook every day. Lacking first class support for these sites basically means that Symbian is missing one of the biggest communication mediums on the planet. Ignoring that because you aren't interested is symptomatic of the kind of attitude that has caused Symbian to be in the position it is today.

And you think that iOS brings such first-class support ? Third party devs did all the job, really. And if you're saying that requiring use of third-party apps before the OS becomes good enough is a sign of quality, I'll start to wonder if Windows 9x could have a future in the smartphone world...

Besides, you don't need thousands of third-party applications to access a website, one is sufficient, and zero can even be sufficient as long as the web browser is good enough and well-integrated... But I disgress.

I don't think we're ever going to agree there, so I believe I'll leave you thinking that Symbian is the DOS (or the Mac OS9 if you think it worked well once, take your pick) of mobile operating systems and go back to something more interesting on my side.

Edited 2011-02-18 07:39 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2