Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 17th Feb 2011 20:33 UTC, submitted by Radio
Windows Well, well, well. We all know Apple's App Store policies are incompatible with the GPL, and as such, software using this license can't be distributed in the App Store. So, what about Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 Marketplace? Well, whereas the App Store doesn't specifically mention the GPL (Apple's terms are simply incompatible), Microsoft drops the pretence and simply bans GPL and GPL-esque licenses outright.
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RE: Comment by Calipso
by Kishe on Thu 17th Feb 2011 23:02 UTC in reply to "Comment by Calipso"
Kishe
Member since:
2006-02-16

Actually Skype got sued for not distributing source for a product manufactured by a third party and which Skype was only reseller to...forcing them to drop all support for that product.

GPLv3 is a borg licence, it doesn't play well with other licences.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Comment by Calipso
by lemur2 on Thu 17th Feb 2011 23:13 in reply to "RE: Comment by Calipso"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Actually Skype got sued for not distributing source for a product manufactured by a third party and which Skype was only reseller to...forcing them to drop all support for that product. GPLv3 is a borg licence, it doesn't play well with other licences.


Sigh!

Since it wasn't Skype's code, how would it have hurt Skype to simply supply the source code on request and thereby become license-compliant?

Why would Skype have to drop it? It isn't Skype's code to start with.

GPLv3 liecense applies only to code which the author decides to release as GPLv3. There is nothing "assimilated" ... it is not the least bit Borg like.

The only problem is if Skype tires to include somone else's GPLv3 source code into a Skype closed-source proprietary product. This is only allowable if the original (non-Skype) code was LGPLv3, not GPLv3.

However, even this situation is a case of Skype trying to steal someone's GPLv3 code, and not at all someones's GPLv3 code being somehow "Borg-like", or a case of "not playing well with other licences". It doesn't matter if the originnal code was commercial or GPLv3 license, Skype still aren't allowed to steal it and include it inside their own product.

At least get the actors right when you ascibe a description to something.

Edited 2011-02-17 23:14 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[3]: Comment by Calipso
by tomcat on Sun 20th Feb 2011 20:15 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by Calipso"
tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

You're either missing the point -- or you're being obtuse. Microsoft obviously doesn't want to get involved with licenses like GPL which put a legal burden on the distributor to do anything special that they aren't required to do otherwise. If somebody wants to create their own parallel App Store for WP7, they're welcome to do it. Just don't expect Microsoft to change its policies to suit ideologically-driven software licenses.

Reply Parent Score: 2